Dutch Design Primer: The New Guard

written by:
January 30, 2014
Each year, Design Academy Eindhoven graduates a promising new roster of talent. Elsewhere in The Netherlands, designers of every stripe (working in everything from textiles to 3-D printing) are catching the world's attention.
  • 
  NEW DUIVENDRECHTIndustrial designers Frederik Roijé and Victor le Noble founded New—a manufacturer of contemporary pieces by young Dutch designers—in an unlikely creative hot spot: Duivendrecht, a town located southeast of Amsterdam. The company yields well-crafted, usable designs—with plenty of that famous Dutch tongue-in-cheek sensibility—that can all be made affordably.

    NEW DUIVENDRECHT

    Industrial designers Frederik Roijé and Victor le Noble founded New—a manufacturer of contemporary pieces by young Dutch designers—in an unlikely creative hot spot: Duivendrecht, a town located southeast of Amsterdam. The company yields well-crafted, usable designs—with plenty of that famous Dutch tongue-in-cheek sensibility—that can all be made affordably.

  • 
  JOOST AND KIKIDesign Academy Eindhoven graduates Joost van Bleiswijk and Kiki van Eijk—known as Joost & Kiki—have gained a following for their conceptual art–based furniture, but recent pieces signal a change. Upcoming collaborations include Dutch design power brand Moooi and furniture whose hue is inspired by Delft blue pottery.  Courtesy of: Nienke Klunder + Wiglius de Bie

    JOOST AND KIKI

    Design Academy Eindhoven graduates Joost van Bleiswijk and Kiki van Eijk—known as Joost & Kiki—have gained a following for their conceptual art–based furniture, but recent pieces signal a change. Upcoming collaborations include Dutch design power brand Moooi and furniture whose hue is inspired by Delft blue pottery.

    Courtesy of: Nienke Klunder + Wiglius de Bie

  • 
  DIRK VANDER KOOIJDirk Vander Kooij's furniture is inspired by a form created with a 30-year-old 3-D printer. Exaggerated lines have become his decorative signature and make his digitally crafted pieces "look like handmade rope furniture." You can buy his pieces, like the Chubby Chair, at Amsterdam's vanguard design shop The Frozen Fountain. 

    DIRK VANDER KOOIJ

    Dirk Vander Kooij's furniture is inspired by a form created with a 30-year-old 3-D printer. Exaggerated lines have become his decorative signature and make his digitally crafted pieces "look like handmade rope furniture." You can buy his pieces, like the Chubby Chair, at Amsterdam's vanguard design shop The Frozen Fountain. 

  • 
  DAPHNA LAURENSDaphna Isaacs Burggraaf and Laurens Manders label their collaborative oeuvre Daphna Laurens because they work so closely. “It’s like finishing each other’s sentences,” says Manders. “We could not work without each other.” Each of their pieces, like the Cirkel Leaning Lamp, is first conceived by cutting paper to make amoebic collages, an abstract beginning that affects each piece's end use.

    DAPHNA LAURENS

    Daphna Isaacs Burggraaf and Laurens Manders label their collaborative oeuvre Daphna Laurens because they work so closely. “It’s like finishing each other’s sentences,” says Manders. “We could not work without each other.” Each of their pieces, like the Cirkel Leaning Lamp, is first conceived by cutting paper to make amoebic collages, an abstract beginning that affects each piece's end use.

  • 
  MARA SKUJENIECEAmsterdam-based Mara Skujeniece is a product designer whose work often narrates an underlying story: Porcelain candleholders have felt coasters that mimic the containers’ shadows; a series of barn drawings she made during a visit to her native Latvia inspired a line of blankets for the TextielMuseum in Tilburg.

    MARA SKUJENIECE

    Amsterdam-based Mara Skujeniece is a product designer whose work often narrates an underlying story: Porcelain candleholders have felt coasters that mimic the containers’ shadows; a series of barn drawings she made during a visit to her native Latvia inspired a line of blankets for the TextielMuseum in Tilburg.

  • 
  FRANK TJEPKEMAFrank Tjepkema founded his industrial design firm, Tjep., in Amsterdam in 2001 and has since produced objects in scales from minute to massive. On the tinier end of the spectrum, he has designed conceptual but wearable jewelry for Dutch design leaders Gijs Bakker and Marijke Vallanzasca. On the larger side, he's completed commercial interiors ranging from restaurants to airport kiosks.

    FRANK TJEPKEMA

    Frank Tjepkema founded his industrial design firm, Tjep., in Amsterdam in 2001 and has since produced objects in scales from minute to massive. On the tinier end of the spectrum, he has designed conceptual but wearable jewelry for Dutch design leaders Gijs Bakker and Marijke Vallanzasca. On the larger side, he's completed commercial interiors ranging from restaurants to airport kiosks.

  • 
  LOTTY LINDEMAN AND WOUTER SCHEUBLINLotty Lindeman and Wouter Scheublin's wood and ceramics workshop is located within designer Piet Hein Eek’s building, a former Philips factory in Eindhoven that was remodeled in 2010 into a furniture factory, restaurant, and several storefront ateliers. Lindeman’s and Scheublin’s work displays a kinetic quality. “We like to be artfully expressive, but the goal is to make products that function in everyday life,” Lindeman says.

    LOTTY LINDEMAN AND WOUTER SCHEUBLIN

    Lotty Lindeman and Wouter Scheublin's wood and ceramics workshop is located within designer Piet Hein Eek’s building, a former Philips factory in Eindhoven that was remodeled in 2010 into a furniture factory, restaurant, and several storefront ateliers. Lindeman’s and Scheublin’s work displays a kinetic quality. “We like to be artfully expressive, but the goal is to make products that function in everyday life,” Lindeman says.

@current / @total

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...