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Design Icon: Greta Grossman

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Greta Grossman, for a while relegated to the footnotes of design history, is finally getting the deserved recognition as one of the pioneers of mid-century modernism in both Sweden and California.
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  Gretta Grossman's work in the interior of the Backus house in Los Angeles in 1950, the Grasshopper lamp prominent in the foreground. Plants played an integral part in Grossman's designs, often serving as room dividers in the open plans of her interiors. Photograph by Donald J. Higgins.
    Gretta Grossman's work in the interior of the Backus house in Los Angeles in 1950, the Grasshopper lamp prominent in the foreground. Plants played an integral part in Grossman's designs, often serving as room dividers in the open plans of her interiors. Photograph by Donald J. Higgins.
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  Today, the Grasshopper lamp is undoubtedly Grossman's most famous design. Introduced in 1947, the Grasshopper is both sophisticated and unobtrusive, which allows it to work well on its own and when paired with other designs. 

    Today, the Grasshopper lamp is undoubtedly Grossman's most famous design. Introduced in 1947, the Grasshopper is both sophisticated and unobtrusive, which allows it to work well on its own and when paired with other designs. 

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  Organic comfort meets modern functionality in the Grasshoper Lamp. In a corner of this Brooklyn Brownstone, a black Greta Grossman Grasshopper lamp sits next to a Bertoia Diamond chair with matching ottoman. Photo by Andrew Cammarano.  Photo by: Andrew Cammarano

    Organic comfort meets modern functionality in the Grasshoper Lamp. In a corner of this Brooklyn Brownstone, a black Greta Grossman Grasshopper lamp sits next to a Bertoia Diamond chair with matching ottoman. Photo by Andrew Cammarano.

    Photo by: Andrew Cammarano

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  The interior of Grossman's home. Photographed by Julius Shulman.
    The interior of Grossman's home. Photographed by Julius Shulman.
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  Interior of Greta Grossman's home. Photograph by Julius Shulman.
    Interior of Greta Grossman's home. Photograph by Julius Shulman.
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  Grossman's 1952 collection, which included a desk and three dressers was named 62-Series because the design was thought to be ten years ahead of its time. Courtesy of Gubi.
    Grossman's 1952 collection, which included a desk and three dressers was named 62-Series because the design was thought to be ten years ahead of its time. Courtesy of Gubi.
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  Grossman's Grasshopper lamp remains one of the most popular midcentury lighting designs. Here, displayed in the Conran Shop, Marylebone, it is matched with a Piano Alto modular sofa and the Prism chandelier designed by Nathalie Dewez. Photo by Paul Raeside.  Photo by: Paul RaesideCourtesy of: Paul Raeside

    Grossman's Grasshopper lamp remains one of the most popular midcentury lighting designs. Here, displayed in the Conran Shop, Marylebone, it is matched with a Piano Alto modular sofa and the Prism chandelier designed by Nathalie Dewez. Photo by Paul Raeside.

    Photo by: Paul Raeside

    Courtesy of: Paul Raeside

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  Grossman made a name for herself in the male-dominated architecture scene in Los Angeles, saying working as a female architect "kept you on your toes. You had to be a step ahead or else." Grossman photographed by Julius Shulman in 1959.
    Grossman made a name for herself in the male-dominated architecture scene in Los Angeles, saying working as a female architect "kept you on your toes. You had to be a step ahead or else." Grossman photographed by Julius Shulman in 1959.

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