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Design Icon: George Nakashima

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A skilled and spiritual craftsman, George Nakashima crafted wood furniture that elevated and showcased natural forms.
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  George Nakashima in his workshop
    George Nakashima in his workshop
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  Splay-Leg Table
Impressed by the simple elegance and understated forms of his work, Hans and Florence Knoll added Nakashima’s work to their roster. This table was designed in 1946 with a low-sheen finish and live grain patterns. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Splay-Leg Table

    Impressed by the simple elegance and understated forms of his work, Hans and Florence Knoll added Nakashima’s work to their roster. This table was designed in 1946 with a low-sheen finish and live grain patterns. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

  • 
  Straight Chair
Another original Knoll design from 1946, the Straight Chair is Nakashima’s spin on the standard Windsor, incorporating traditional techniques, Nakashima sometimes called himself a “Japanese Shaker,” in reference to his fusion of classic, Modernist and Shaker styles. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Straight Chair

    Another original Knoll design from 1946, the Straight Chair is Nakashima’s spin on the standard Windsor, incorporating traditional techniques, Nakashima sometimes called himself a “Japanese Shaker,” in reference to his fusion of classic, Modernist and Shaker styles. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

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  Conoid Bench
An intricate example of Nakashima placing minimal adornments on the wood, merely capturing it, preserving it and giving it a second life. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Conoid Bench

    An intricate example of Nakashima placing minimal adornments on the wood, merely capturing it, preserving it and giving it a second life. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

  • 
  Mira Chair
These three-legged chairs were designed in 1950 for George’s daughter, Mira, who now runs George Nakashima Woodworker, the company that carries on the Nakashima legacy. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Mira Chair

    These three-legged chairs were designed in 1950 for George’s daughter, Mira, who now runs George Nakashima Woodworker, the company that carries on the Nakashima legacy. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

  • 
  Conoid Table
Pieces from this series, named after Nakashima’s Conoid workshop, which he opened in 1957, focus on free-edge forms, respecting and conforming to the natural shape of the wood, and often employ cantilever technology. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Conoid Table

    Pieces from this series, named after Nakashima’s Conoid workshop, which he opened in 1957, focus on free-edge forms, respecting and conforming to the natural shape of the wood, and often employ cantilever technology. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

  • 
  George Nakashima with his daughter Mira in his workshop
    George Nakashima with his daughter Mira in his workshop
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  Slab Coffee Table
An example of one of Nakashima’s most iconic designs, this large piece was crafted from walnut. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Slab Coffee Table

    An example of one of Nakashima’s most iconic designs, this large piece was crafted from walnut. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

  • 
  Asa-No-Ha Lamp
These intricately patterned lamps were created to illuminate his work at a show overseas. Some of these reside in the Rockefeller’s mansion. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Asa-No-Ha Lamp

    These intricately patterned lamps were created to illuminate his work at a show overseas. Some of these reside in the Rockefeller’s mansion. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

  • 
  Chigaindana Shelf
Initially built for Widdicomb-Mueller in the ‘60s, these Mondrian-like forms draw inspiration from Japanese architecture. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.
    Chigaindana Shelf

    Initially built for Widdicomb-Mueller in the ‘60s, these Mondrian-like forms draw inspiration from Japanese architecture. Photo courtesy George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

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