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Interior Design: Nicole Hollis

To call interior designer Nicole Hollis’s portfolio “eclectic” is an understatement. On one page you’ll find a modern man-cave with a colorful LED-lit staircase and on the next, a rustic kitchen outfitted with copper pots and wicker baskets. Each project has its own merits, but Hollis’s greatest strength as a designer lies in her chameleonlike ability to channel her clients’ desires.

 

Interior designer Nicole Hollis

After working for famed Napa Valley architect Howard Backen, Hollis founded her eponymous San Francisco firm in 2003. “I was turning 30 and thought, What do I want to do?” she remembers. “I didn’t have a Rolodex of names but I knew I wanted to do my own thing and had my own ­vision.” That vision included preserving the craft of carefully curated interiors. “I worry that the art of architecture and design will be lost on today’s disposable society,” she says. “I don’t think there are five easy steps. You can’t just Google ‘the art of living.’ Anyone can pick a chair but is it the right scale, fabric, proportion, weight?”

To successfully design beautiful, functional spaces, Hollis insists that collaboration—–whether with the architects on her staff or out-of-house landscape or audiovisual designers—–is the key. “You can’t ignore architecture; it’s what activates the interior,” she says. Today, however, “everything’s become so specialized,” Hollis says. “You’ve got to collaborate if you’re going to create great interiors.” After all, as she likes to say, it’s not the
Nicole Show.

  • Young Guns Dwell graphic

    Young Designers

    Branching out and doing your own thing is a brave and bold move at any time and any age. That said, the 21 visionaries we profile here—–designers 
of interiors, graphics, architecture, exhibitions, furniture, landscapes, 
and communities both online and off—–are all younger than 40 and are building their careers in the United States during an economic recession. Their mediums range wildly, from high-end residential town houses 
to urban postindustrial landscapes, but what they all share are uncommon tenacity and highly personal approaches to blazing their own paths. We’ve found editors who reinvented themselves as unconventional bloggers when their magazine shuttered; community activists who are transforming foreclosed houses in Detroit into models of environmental sustainability; and designers who’ve built burgeoning furniture companies in their own backyards. Neither an exhaustive compendium nor an exclusive best-of list, this roundup is a sampling of rising stars whose work continues to catch our eyes and imaginations.

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Comments

Nicole is a joy to work with and did an excellent job with my husbands restaurant! She is awesome!!

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