Marimekko's Iconic Patterns

written by:
July 26, 2011
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  Lumimarja, designed by Erja Hirvi in 2004, is one of Marimekko's best-selling textiles. Marimekko gives contributors carte blanche on how to present their ideas to the artwork team: Some paint, some draw, some design on computers. Hirvi presented her idea with real branches attached to a piece of paper with tape.

    Lumimarja, designed by Erja Hirvi in 2004, is one of Marimekko's best-selling textiles. Marimekko gives contributors carte blanche on how to present their ideas to the artwork team: Some paint, some draw, some design on computers. Hirvi presented her idea with real branches attached to a piece of paper with tape.

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  In 1964, Maija Isola designed Marimekko's most popular and most recognizable pattern in its collection. Unikko, which means poppy, follows Ratia's unconventional vision of presenting bold, bright patterns to the public. This pillow, sold at Marimekko Shops at select Crate and Barrel locations and at crateandbarrel.com, feature the Pieni Unikko print, which is a middle print between the original Unikko pattern and Mini-Unikko.

    In 1964, Maija Isola designed Marimekko's most popular and most recognizable pattern in its collection. Unikko, which means poppy, follows Ratia's unconventional vision of presenting bold, bright patterns to the public. This pillow, sold at Marimekko Shops at select Crate and Barrel locations and at crateandbarrel.com, feature the Pieni Unikko print, which is a middle print between the original Unikko pattern and Mini-Unikko.

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  The Pieni Unikko print has taken on all kinds of color combinations since it was unveiled nearly 50 years ago. Shown here is dubbed option 560.  Courtesy of Marimekko Corporation .

    The Pieni Unikko print has taken on all kinds of color combinations since it was unveiled nearly 50 years ago. Shown here is dubbed option 560.

    Courtesy of Marimekko Corporation .
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  Isola designed more than 500 patterns for Marimekko, including this Joonas fabric in 1961 (three years before Unikko).

    Isola designed more than 500 patterns for Marimekko, including this Joonas fabric in 1961 (three years before Unikko).

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  Though this colorful pattern, named Lappuliisa, was designed this year by artist Maija Louekari, we'd bet it's one that's here to stay. Louekari was inspired by her grandmother's vintage crocheted potholders.

    Though this colorful pattern, named Lappuliisa, was designed this year by artist Maija Louekari, we'd bet it's one that's here to stay. Louekari was inspired by her grandmother's vintage crocheted potholders.

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  Louekari has been a prolific Marimekko contributor in recent years. In 2007 she created this graphic pattern called Ruutukaava.

    Louekari has been a prolific Marimekko contributor in recent years. In 2007 she created this graphic pattern called Ruutukaava.

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  In 2009 she designed this Siirtolapuutarha pattern, which has been put to many applications. The textile is meant to tell the story of the growth of flower and vegetable beds in Finland's urban areas.

    In 2009 she designed this Siirtolapuutarha pattern, which has been put to many applications. The textile is meant to tell the story of the growth of flower and vegetable beds in Finland's urban areas.

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  Here, Louekari's Siirtolapuutarha pattern appears on an eight-inch vitreous porcelain bowl.  Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.

    Here, Louekari's Siirtolapuutarha pattern appears on an eight-inch vitreous porcelain bowl.

    Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.
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  Her Siirtolapuutarha Räsymatto pattern features a whimsical, off-kilter pattern of dots. Here it's applied to a porcelain cup.  Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.

    Her Siirtolapuutarha Räsymatto pattern features a whimsical, off-kilter pattern of dots. Here it's applied to a porcelain cup.

    Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.
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  Here, the blue dots of Louekari's Siirtolapuutarha Räsymatto pattern brighten a white apron.  Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.

    Here, the blue dots of Louekari's Siirtolapuutarha Räsymatto pattern brighten a white apron.

    Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.
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  Designer Iiro A. Ahokas designed this Kirsikka pattern in 2007 inspired by cherries that had fallen to the ground.

    Designer Iiro A. Ahokas designed this Kirsikka pattern in 2007 inspired by cherries that had fallen to the ground.

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  Miina Äkkijyrkkä's 2008 pattern Iltavilli, which means wild in the evening, has been interpreted on fabric as well as products like cups and the plate shown here.  Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.

    Miina Äkkijyrkkä's 2008 pattern Iltavilli, which means wild in the evening, has been interpreted on fabric as well as products like cups and the plate shown here.

    Courtesy of Paavo Lehtonen.
  • 
  Marimekko's Juhannustaika fabric by Aino-Maija Metsola shows its softer (yet no less colorful) side. For more Marimekko, watch our Process slideshow, in which we tour the Marimekko factory in Helsinki to see how the company's iconic textiles come to life.  

    Marimekko's Juhannustaika fabric by Aino-Maija Metsola shows its softer (yet no less colorful) side. For more Marimekko, watch our Process slideshow, in which we tour the Marimekko factory in Helsinki to see how the company's iconic textiles come to life.

     

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