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Ocean-Inspired Porcelain Designs by Maria Moyer

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In essence, wabi-sabi is the Japanese art of finding beauty in imperfection, profoundness in nature and valuing authenticity above all else. This description could accurately be used to characterize sculptor Maria Moyer’s work as well.
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  “I'm moved by that which is all around us, but we might have stopped seeing or maybe never really noticed—like the ubiquity and exquisite weirdness of nature,” says Maria Moyer. “In art—as in fashion, I'm often attracted to things that might be a bit odd or disturbing at first, as they hold my interest in a different way than conventional beauty.”Diatom, unglazed porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

    “I'm moved by that which is all around us, but we might have stopped seeing or maybe never really noticed—like the ubiquity and exquisite weirdness of nature,” says Maria Moyer. “In art—as in fashion, I'm often attracted to things that might be a bit odd or disturbing at first, as they hold my interest in a different way than conventional beauty.”

    Diatom, unglazed porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

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  Growing up in California, Maria Moyer was inspired by nature from an early age. The ocean, in particular, is a constant source of inspiration.Discs, blue wash on unglazed white porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

    Growing up in California, Maria Moyer was inspired by nature from an early age. The ocean, in particular, is a constant source of inspiration.

    Discs, blue wash on unglazed white porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

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   “Over the past fifteen years, I've moved between found objects, wood and ceramic as preferred sculpture media. I consider myself a sculptor more than a ceramist.”Discs, blue wash on unglazed white porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

     

    “Over the past fifteen years, I've moved between found objects, wood and ceramic as preferred sculpture media. I consider myself a sculptor more than a ceramist.”

    Discs, blue wash on unglazed white porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

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  The process of making is at the heart of Moyer’s work, and evidence of human touch, like a visible fingerprint or two, often remains on the work after firing. “It's the perfect blend of intellectual-physical pursuits—the idea and the knowledge of how to do something and then, finally, the actual physical ability of being able to manifest it,” she says. “The learning never stops and the results vary. Some things work, others just don't.”Orbs and vacuoles, unglazed porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

    The process of making is at the heart of Moyer’s work, and evidence of human touch, like a visible fingerprint or two, often remains on the work after firing. “It's the perfect blend of intellectual-physical pursuits—the idea and the knowledge of how to do something and then, finally, the actual physical ability of being able to manifest it,” she says. “The learning never stops and the results vary. Some things work, others just don't.”

    Orbs and vacuoles, unglazed porcelain, available at March in San Francisco.

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  Maria Moyer in the West Village, NY sculpture studio she frequently works out of. Photo by: Leslie Williamson

    Maria Moyer in the West Village, NY sculpture studio she frequently works out of. Photo by: Leslie Williamson

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  A piece takes Moyer anywhere from a few days to several weeks to make, depending on factors like how long it takes to build and how long it has to dry before firing. Photo by: Leslie WilliamsonDiatom, unglazed porcelain, available at March in San Francisco. 

    A piece takes Moyer anywhere from a few days to several weeks to make, depending on factors like how long it takes to build and how long it has to dry before firing. Photo by: Leslie Williamson

    Diatom, unglazed porcelain, available at March in San Francisco

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  Though she cares a great deal about controlling fine details, Moyer finds the random and often-surprising variations that occur at 1,700–2,200ºF to be thrilling.Stoneware duo, available at BDDW in NYC.

    Though she cares a great deal about controlling fine details, Moyer finds the random and often-surprising variations that occur at 1,700–2,200ºF to be thrilling.

    Stoneware duo, available at BDDW in NYC.

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  Maria Moyer’s stoneware and porcelain hammer is modeled after one of her most treasured possessions—an actual hammer that once belonged to her grandfather.Stoneware and porcelain hammer, available at March in San Francisco.

    Maria Moyer’s stoneware and porcelain hammer is modeled after one of her most treasured possessions—an actual hammer that once belonged to her grandfather.

    Stoneware and porcelain hammer, available at March in San Francisco.

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  Part of the proceeds from the “Plankton Series” collection, Maria Moyer’s collaboration with West Elm, were donated to Oceana. This is Moyer’s own collection, displayed in her guest bedroom.

    Part of the proceeds from the “Plankton Series” collection, Maria Moyer’s collaboration with West Elm, were donated to Oceana. This is Moyer’s own collection, displayed in her guest bedroom.

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  Unglazed porcelain and leather necklaces, available at March in San Francisco and Loomstate.

    Unglazed porcelain and leather necklaces, available at March in San Francisco and Loomstate.

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