From Stockholm: Gärsnäs, Old & New

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February 12, 2011

Since 1893, Gärsnäs has worked with furniture artisans to create wood works that are durable, pleasing to the eye, and functional. The fifty-person company always has a lovely presence at the Stockholm Furniture Fair, and this year's booth was no exception. Strong, lyrical pieces by Nina Jobs, Inga Sempé, Monica Förster, Pierre Sindre, and Åke Axelsso included everything from children's furniture to auditorium seating, reflecting the company's dedication to form and playfulness, as well as their focus on detail and thoughtful innovation. Old favorites receive slight modifications, and never-before-seen items were eagerly perused by show-goers.

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  The Zen conference chair by Åke Axelsson, a Småland–born designer who has been making wood furniture pieces since the fourth grade. The ash chair has rounded legs, and can be covered in fabric or leather.  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    The Zen conference chair by Åke Axelsson, a Småland–born designer who has been making wood furniture pieces since the fourth grade. The ash chair has rounded legs, and can be covered in fabric or leather.

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

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  The Österlen chair, by Inga Sempé is so named for the area in southern Sweden in which it was built. Sempé, a southerner herself, used typical bentwood techniques to craft the piece, which features U-shaped cuts in the legs and back. Sempé also debuted a table of the same name.  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    The Österlen chair, by Inga Sempé is so named for the area in southern Sweden in which it was built. Sempé, a southerner herself, used typical bentwood techniques to craft the piece, which features U-shaped cuts in the legs and back. Sempé also debuted a table of the same name.

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

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  The Österlen table and chair, by Inga Sempé, glimpsed on the show floor.
    The Österlen table and chair, by Inga Sempé, glimpsed on the show floor.
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  Another piece by Åke Axelsson is the Milla chair for children. Axelsson explains that the piece, which is stackable, is meant for a smaller child, but that the form "awakens imagination and inspiration." Available in natural birch or stained.  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    Another piece by Åke Axelsson is the Milla chair for children. Axelsson explains that the piece, which is stackable, is meant for a smaller child, but that the form "awakens imagination and inspiration." Available in natural birch or stained.

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

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  Pierre Sindre continues to add slight modifications to his well-received Button chair (2008); this season it reappears in fabric, felt or leather.  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    Pierre Sindre continues to add slight modifications to his well-received Button chair (2008); this season it reappears in fabric, felt or leather.

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

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  Nina Jobs claims her inspiration for her immensely likable Kvilt line, which first appeared in prototype form in 2009, is the puffy informality of thick winter coats. The vibrant orange hue is a nice update.  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    Nina Jobs claims her inspiration for her immensely likable Kvilt line, which first appeared in prototype form in 2009, is the puffy informality of thick winter coats. The vibrant orange hue is a nice update.

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

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  Monica Förster's winsome Motion peice is an asymmetrical answer to boring old bench. It can be linked to a table, or it can go on for days by linking a number of them together.  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    Monica Förster's winsome Motion peice is an asymmetrical answer to boring old bench. It can be linked to a table, or it can go on for days by linking a number of them together.

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

@current / @total

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