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August 7, 2013
Tucked into corners or folded into walls, hideaway beds accommodate last minute guests and open up potentially cramped spaces.
In addition to wood and concrete, the other main material in the house is quarter-inch single-pane glass: No room is without a natural light source, whether from skylights, mitered corner windows, or clerestories, as in the old bedroom of the Kappes' son

Los Angeles architect Ray Kappe built his family home back in 1967; hidden platform beds fit snugly in warm wood rooms. 

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Originally appeared in Ray Kappe-Designed Multilevel House in Los Angeles
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Lowering the custom encased Murphy bed

"The Cube," as it is known, transforms into a room, then back into a big box when closed. By lowering the custom Murphy bed and rolling a sliding plywood door, Aleksander Novak-Zemplinski creates an insta-guestroom in his small, industrial-style Warsaw loft.

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Courtesy of 
©Andreas Meichsner
Originally appeared in Warsaw Loft with Multifunctional Furniture
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Modern guest bedroom office with fold-out Murphy bed

The library and office transforms into a guest bedroom in Dr. Kenneth Montague’s apartment. The painting is Untitled (Corner Rainbow) by Elizabeth McIntosh.

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Courtesy of 
© 2012 Naomi Finlay
Originally appeared in Party-Friendly Apartment in Toronto
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Wraparound wooden bedroom with bunk bed nooks

The kids stow away into their custom bunk beds each night. "Rather than trying to fit the furniture into the apartment, we decided to fit the apartment into the furniture," says architect Antoine Santiard. "However absurd this may seem, it immediately alleviated all the constraints linked to laying out tight spaces." The wool curtain dividing the space was made by a local company called Arpin. The custom track is by G-Rail.

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Julien Attard
Originally appeared in Cabin Fever
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Double Murphy Bed by Casa Kids
Do it Yourself: Double Murphy Bed, this Baltic birch bunk tucks into a 12-inch-deep wall for an easy hidden addition to your home. $4,500
 
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In addition to wood and concrete, the other main material in the house is quarter-inch single-pane glass: No room is without a natural light source, whether from skylights, mitered corner windows, or clerestories, as in the old bedroom of the Kappes' son

Los Angeles architect Ray Kappe built his family home back in 1967; hidden platform beds fit snugly in warm wood rooms. 

Photo by João Canziani.

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