Winners of "Healthy Homes" for Haiti

written by:
January 12, 2011

In the wake of the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010, ARCHIVE, a non-profit whose efforts center on the use of housing as a strategy for preventing illness and providing care among the poor, sponsored a design competition called "Healthy Homes." In an effort to limit the spread of Tuberculosis (one of the leading infectious diseases in Haiti), 147 teams of architects, engineers, public health workers, and doctors designed homes that are environmentally conscious, sensitive to the economic and cultural environment. Additionally, they use local building materials and construction techniques wherever possible and are easily replicable . What was interesting about this competition is that it isn't simply a "design exercise"; the winning entries will now inform new housing construction in the Artibonite region of the country. Click through the slideshow below to see the five winning designs.

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  At the heart of "Breathe House" is the concept of sustainable health and housing. Its key design elements include the use of natural light and ventilation, access to clean water and independent renewable energy, and the combination of passive environmental systems with modest active ventilation.  The design engages the involvement of regional building industries with the intention of expanding the local building trades and improving the overall building stock in the area. Highlights of the design include the use of local materials, composting toilets, excellent ventilation, and strong use of landscaping. The simplicity of construction and accompanying "users guide" meant that work could be carried out by local less-skilled workers: an important community strengthening attribute. 

Designed by Anselmo Canfora, Richard Guerrant, Ewan Smith, Galen Staengl, Michael Stoneking, Aja Bull-Richards, Sara Harper, Sally Lee, Nathan Parker, Chase Sparling-Beckley, and Lauren Thompson.
    At the heart of "Breathe House" is the concept of sustainable health and housing. Its key design elements include the use of natural light and ventilation, access to clean water and independent renewable energy, and the combination of passive environmental systems with modest active ventilation. The design engages the involvement of regional building industries with the intention of expanding the local building trades and improving the overall building stock in the area. Highlights of the design include the use of local materials, composting toilets, excellent ventilation, and strong use of landscaping. The simplicity of construction and accompanying "users guide" meant that work could be carried out by local less-skilled workers: an important community strengthening attribute. Designed by Anselmo Canfora, Richard Guerrant, Ewan Smith, Galen Staengl, Michael Stoneking, Aja Bull-Richards, Sara Harper, Sally Lee, Nathan Parker, Chase Sparling-Beckley, and Lauren Thompson.
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  The idea behind Maison Canopy is to offer a sanctuary to heal the body and spirit. The open plan of this home creates a protected yet open place from which to engage new neighbors and build new friendships. Maison Canopy was praised as a “a low-tech, user-friendly design” using “recognizable and familiar building technologies.” In this design, cooking and communal areas are separated, maximizing cross ventilation, and insect screens acknowledge the prevalence of vector-borne diseases.  Additionally, the rainwater harvesting and storage facility and the sanitation and waste management technologies can easily be managed and adapted.

Designed by Lilian Sherrard and Brook K. Sherrard.
    The idea behind Maison Canopy is to offer a sanctuary to heal the body and spirit. The open plan of this home creates a protected yet open place from which to engage new neighbors and build new friendships. Maison Canopy was praised as a “a low-tech, user-friendly design” using “recognizable and familiar building technologies.” In this design, cooking and communal areas are separated, maximizing cross ventilation, and insect screens acknowledge the prevalence of vector-borne diseases. Additionally, the rainwater harvesting and storage facility and the sanitation and waste management technologies can easily be managed and adapted. Designed by Lilian Sherrard and Brook K. Sherrard.
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  "Shutter Dwelling" focuses on using the functional distribution of space to facilitate the interaction of patients with other occupants.  It uses the separation of the bedroom and the connected bathrooms from other spaces to limit the mixture of infected and clean airflows, and emphasizes the use of the kitchen as social space. The design makes use of local building practices, such as the concrete block walling and timber framing/cladding, with key additions such as steel reinforcement and angling to provide more protection and higher performance. 

Designed by Marco Ferri, Giorgio Giannattasio, Sara Parlato, Roberto Pennachio, Andrea Tulisi.
    "Shutter Dwelling" focuses on using the functional distribution of space to facilitate the interaction of patients with other occupants. It uses the separation of the bedroom and the connected bathrooms from other spaces to limit the mixture of infected and clean airflows, and emphasizes the use of the kitchen as social space. The design makes use of local building practices, such as the concrete block walling and timber framing/cladding, with key additions such as steel reinforcement and angling to provide more protection and higher performance. Designed by Marco Ferri, Giorgio Giannattasio, Sara Parlato, Roberto Pennachio, Andrea Tulisi.
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  The defining feature of "Bois l'Etat" is the focus on communal planning and lifestyle.  As the heart of its spirit is the use of local materials and building practices wherever possible, with the expense of construction and development finding its way back into the local economy. The dwelling utilizes all available and practical sustainable methods to promote healthy living. The addition of rainwater harvesting, composting toilets and the efficient use of energy and resources led the judges to describe it as “an elegant evolution of familiar, simple housing typologies”. For the site inhabitants, the design team envisions a transformation: a restoration from stigma and struggle, the creation of a self-sufficient environment, and becoming contributors to the marketplace and the world beyond. 

Designed by Gregory Canaras, Wayne Norbeck, Jordan Rogove, Moya Brown, Lynn Dee Silver, Wendy Meguro, Junko Nakagawa, Patrick Cullina, Erin Reisinger, and Donald Chalfin.
    The defining feature of "Bois l'Etat" is the focus on communal planning and lifestyle. As the heart of its spirit is the use of local materials and building practices wherever possible, with the expense of construction and development finding its way back into the local economy. The dwelling utilizes all available and practical sustainable methods to promote healthy living. The addition of rainwater harvesting, composting toilets and the efficient use of energy and resources led the judges to describe it as “an elegant evolution of familiar, simple housing typologies”. For the site inhabitants, the design team envisions a transformation: a restoration from stigma and struggle, the creation of a self-sufficient environment, and becoming contributors to the marketplace and the world beyond. Designed by Gregory Canaras, Wayne Norbeck, Jordan Rogove, Moya Brown, Lynn Dee Silver, Wendy Meguro, Junko Nakagawa, Patrick Cullina, Erin Reisinger, and Donald Chalfin.
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  "Cycle House" revolves around the idea of open and closed spaces that promote and facilitate a healthy lifestyle. The design defines two types of spaces: solid spaces (ie. rooms and bathrooms), which are the only completely closed structures and independent of the house, and open spaces, which are lined with blinds and sliding screen doors. Additionally four green spaces are to be planted with medicinal herbs to help patients with the preparation of tizanas or aromatherapy. Stationary bicycles in the Cycle House also generate electricity and are able to be detached to be used for local transportation.  

Designed by Henry Luis Oquet, Kenneth Lopez, Arlin Morales, and Pedro Almonte.
    "Cycle House" revolves around the idea of open and closed spaces that promote and facilitate a healthy lifestyle. The design defines two types of spaces: solid spaces (ie. rooms and bathrooms), which are the only completely closed structures and independent of the house, and open spaces, which are lined with blinds and sliding screen doors. Additionally four green spaces are to be planted with medicinal herbs to help patients with the preparation of tizanas or aromatherapy. Stationary bicycles in the Cycle House also generate electricity and are able to be detached to be used for local transportation. Designed by Henry Luis Oquet, Kenneth Lopez, Arlin Morales, and Pedro Almonte.
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  Community involvement was a key part of the design competition. Charrettes were held in the city of Saint-Marc where residents talked with designers about their ideal house and how current housing affected their health.
    Community involvement was a key part of the design competition. Charrettes were held in the city of Saint-Marc where residents talked with designers about their ideal house and how current housing affected their health.

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