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Textile Exhibit to Feature Picasso, Dali, Matisse Designs

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A London exhibition uses works by Picasso, Dali, Matisse, and others to trace the evolution of 20th century textile design.
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  A collage-based abstract design by Jon Catleugh, produced by David Whitehead Ltd. The Lancashire-based firm produced three textiles by Catleugh, all of which were developed from artworks exhibited in 1953. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    A collage-based abstract design by Jon Catleugh, produced by David Whitehead Ltd. The Lancashire-based firm produced three textiles by Catleugh, all of which were developed from artworks exhibited in 1953. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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  "White Trellis," an artist’s square designed by Graham Sutherland for Ascher Ltd, 1946. Ascher exhibted a version of this scarf and a companion design at "Britain Can Make It," a 1946 London exhibition of industrial and product designs. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    "White Trellis," an artist’s square designed by Graham Sutherland for Ascher Ltd, 1946. Ascher exhibted a version of this scarf and a companion design at "Britain Can Make It," a 1946 London exhibition of industrial and product designs. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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  "Family Group," an artist’s square designed by Henry Moore for Ascher, was exhibited both at "Britain Can Make It" in 1946 and the Lefevre Gallery in 1947, as well as being used for the cover of Grace Lovat Fraser’s book Textiles by Britain, 1948. The original sketches for the square date from around 1944. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    "Family Group," an artist’s square designed by Henry Moore for Ascher, was exhibited both at "Britain Can Make It" in 1946 and the Lefevre Gallery in 1947, as well as being used for the cover of Grace Lovat Fraser’s book Textiles by Britain, 1948. The original sketches for the square date from around 1944. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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  Henri Matisse’s first design for Ascher, "Echarpe No. 1," was exhibited at the Lefevre Gallery in 1947. One of the two coral-based designs, it was intended to be produced in a limited edition of 275. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    Henri Matisse’s first design for Ascher, "Echarpe No. 1," was exhibited at the Lefevre Gallery in 1947. One of the two coral-based designs, it was intended to be produced in a limited edition of 275. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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  "Number, Please?" a silk scarf designed by Salvador Dali for Wesley Simpson circa 1947. The design is derived from a sequence in Destino, Dali’s animation for Disney from 1946. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    "Number, Please?" a silk scarf designed by Salvador Dali for Wesley Simpson circa 1947. The design is derived from a sequence in Destino, Dali’s animation for Disney from 1946. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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  "Ballerina," a screen-printed silk scarf designed by Dali for Wesley Simpson, circa 1947. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    "Ballerina," a screen-printed silk scarf designed by Dali for Wesley Simpson, circa 1947. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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  "A Fish is a Fish is a Fish," designed by the painter and designer Ken Scott, was featured in Interiors magazine in September 1951. Shown here is a printed version for dresses and skirts. It was also printed as a furnishing textile by W.B. Quaintence of New York and was marketed in the United Kingdom through Sanderson & Son Ltd. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

    "A Fish is a Fish is a Fish," designed by the painter and designer Ken Scott, was featured in Interiors magazine in September 1951. Shown here is a printed version for dresses and skirts. It was also printed as a furnishing textile by W.B. Quaintence of New York and was marketed in the United Kingdom through Sanderson & Son Ltd. Courtesy of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

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