Space Race

written by:
March 19, 2013
From a metal-clad prefab module in Wyoming to an accordion-doored home in Canada, take a breath of fresh air with these five homes that make use of expansive windows.
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  The rear of the Chistopher Polly-designed Elliott Ripper house shows the most impactful design moves—windows that allow light and air to enter the house. Breezway Altair louvers, Viridian Comfort Plus low-e glass, and Western Red Cedar–framed sliding glass doors on the ground floor and pivot stay windows on the second story allow residents to control how open or closed the house is. Photo by: Brett Boardman

    The rear of the Chistopher Polly-designed Elliott Ripper house shows the most impactful design moves—windows that allow light and air to enter the house. Breezway Altair louvers, Viridian Comfort Plus low-e glass, and Western Red Cedar–framed sliding glass doors on the ground floor and pivot stay windows on the second story allow residents to control how open or closed the house is. Photo by: Brett Boardman

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  Expansive accordion doors join together in a sharp angle when shut, but when they’re open the crook competely disappears—as does the barrier between outside and in. Photo by: Jason Schmidt

    Expansive accordion doors join together in a sharp angle when shut, but when they’re open the crook competely disappears—as does the barrier between outside and in. Photo by: Jason Schmidt

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  A nearly 360 degree view of trees outside contribute to the treehouse feel of the second floor. This shot at dusk shows off the garage door’s perfect mix of in and out for entertaining purposes. Photo by: Michael Wells

    A nearly 360 degree view of trees outside contribute to the treehouse feel of the second floor. This shot at dusk shows off the garage door’s perfect mix of in and out for entertaining purposes. Photo by: Michael Wells

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  Nestled in a field of praire grass in the Wisconsin woods, the Weekn’der is a dynamic contrast of minimalist black and white. Charlie Lazor's design consists of two prefab modules bookending a central stick-built home. Photo by: George Heinrich

    Nestled in a field of praire grass in the Wisconsin woods, the Weekn’der is a dynamic contrast of minimalist black and white. Charlie Lazor's design consists of two prefab modules bookending a central stick-built home. Photo by: George Heinrich

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  Set amongst the Washington woods, architect Peter Anderson explains that “the floating nature of the design would not have been possible with conventional onsite framing techniques, nor any of the currently marketed modular home designs.” Photo by: John Clark

    Set amongst the Washington woods, architect Peter Anderson explains that “the floating nature of the design would not have been possible with conventional onsite framing techniques, nor any of the currently marketed modular home designs.” Photo by: John Clark

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