The Sky is the Limit

written by:
February 12, 2013
These stilted homes transcend traditional architecture.
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  The corrugated steel panels and steel beams used for the Kitchener residence were created offsite and trucked in. Take a look at  the rest of this home here.
  Photo by: Peter HyattCourtesy of: 
Peter Hyatt

    The corrugated steel panels and steel beams used for the Kitchener residence were created offsite and trucked in. Take a look at the rest of this home here.


    Photo by: Peter Hyatt

    Courtesy of: 
Peter Hyatt

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  The Casa Cuatro, located in Chile, sits above a 180-foot cliff that overlooks the Pacific Ocean. See more of this green home here.  Photo by: Cristóbal PalmaCourtesy of: Crisobal Palma

    The Casa Cuatro, located in Chile, sits above a 180-foot cliff that overlooks the Pacific Ocean. See more of this green home here.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    Courtesy of: Crisobal Palma

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  Julie, James, and their son Christian enjoy an unexpected bonus of living in a house on stilts––a pair of swings suspended from the base of the structure. See the full gallery of images here.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair

    Julie, James, and their son Christian enjoy an unexpected bonus of living in a house on stilts––a pair of swings suspended from the base of the structure. See the full gallery of images here.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

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  Nine slender steel columns held in place by cross-bracing hold this small weekend house 21 feet in midair. Click here for more stilted living in Japan.  Courtesy of: Go Hasegawa

    Nine slender steel columns held in place by cross-bracing hold this small weekend house 21 feet in midair. Click here for more stilted living in Japan.

    Courtesy of: Go Hasegawa

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  The deck built on the ground level of the holiday home designed by André Lessard and Barbara Dewhirst provides ample outdoor space during inclement weather. See more  of this Canadian Beacon here.  Photo by: Paul OrensteinCourtesy of: Paul Orenstein


    The deck built on the ground level of the holiday home designed by André Lessard and Barbara Dewhirst provides ample outdoor space during inclement weather. See more of this Canadian Beacon here.

    Photo by: Paul Orenstein

    Courtesy of: Paul Orenstein


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  It’s a fact of physics that hot air rises, and this simple concept is all Maria and Matthew Salenger needed to design a passive cooling system for the backyard pods they use as bedrooms at their house in Tempe––where the average daily temperature is 86 degrees. The light, steel-framed structures float on stilts above the yard, allowing cooler air to circulate underneath. Click to see more of this modern pod house in Arizona.  Photo by: Bill TimmermanCourtesy of: Bill Timmerman



    It’s a fact of physics that hot air rises, and this simple concept is all Maria and Matthew Salenger needed to design a passive cooling system for the backyard pods they use as bedrooms at their house in Tempe––where the average daily temperature is 86 degrees. The light, steel-framed structures float on stilts above the yard, allowing cooler air to circulate underneath. Click to see more of this modern pod house in Arizona.

    Photo by: Bill Timmerman

    Courtesy of: Bill Timmerman



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