Six Stairs to Savor

written by:
March 21, 2013
When getting from here to there, the journey is just as important as the destination. We hope that's true for interior spaces as well as lifechanging travel experiences, and with that in mind, we've combed the Dwell archives for a few especially stunning stairwells. See part 1 in beautiful modern staircases here and the most popular stairway designs from our archives here.
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  Behind an unassuming 19th-century facade in Singapore, Ching Ian and Yang Yeo live in a very atypical renovation of a typical shophouse. Here, Yeo descends the spiral staircase that connects the public and private spaces while Ian relaxes on a pair of Cappellini Superlight 750 sofas designed by Barber Osgerby. Photo by: Richard Powers
    Behind an unassuming 19th-century facade in Singapore, Ching Ian and Yang Yeo live in a very atypical renovation of a typical shophouse. Here, Yeo descends the spiral staircase that connects the public and private spaces while Ian relaxes on a pair of Cappellini Superlight 750 sofas designed by Barber Osgerby. Photo by: Richard Powers
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  Pieter Weijnen’s brand of maritime modernism brings a touch of magic to Amsterdam’s Steigereiland, where the architect built his family’s home. The "floating" staircase is actually supported by steel rods hidden within each step. Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    Pieter Weijnen’s brand of maritime modernism brings a touch of magic to Amsterdam’s Steigereiland, where the architect built his family’s home. The "floating" staircase is actually supported by steel rods hidden within each step. Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
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  Argentinean materials, a roiling economy, and a pinch of personal tumult served as the recipe for furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti’s Buenos Aires oasis. The wood-and-steel open staircase wends its way up three stories, supported by a concrete structural wall embedded with PVC tubes and bare lightbulbs. Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    Argentinean materials, a roiling economy, and a pinch of personal tumult served as the recipe for furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti’s Buenos Aires oasis. The wood-and-steel open staircase wends its way up three stories, supported by a concrete structural wall embedded with PVC tubes and bare lightbulbs. Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
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  Yvette Leeper-Bueno and Adrian Bueno’s home, on West 112th Street in New York, is recognizable by its two-story bay window angled to bring light and views into the dark, narrow structure. Seemingly a single, seamless unit, the stair is composed of two elements—treads and mezzanine—and held in place by two distinct strategies: The stairs are welded to, and cantilever out from, a series of steel tubes concealed in the walls; the mezzanine is attached on one side to a steel beam, and hung at two other points from rods attached to the roof structure. Photo by: Adam Friedberg
    Yvette Leeper-Bueno and Adrian Bueno’s home, on West 112th Street in New York, is recognizable by its two-story bay window angled to bring light and views into the dark, narrow structure. Seemingly a single, seamless unit, the stair is composed of two elements—treads and mezzanine—and held in place by two distinct strategies: The stairs are welded to, and cantilever out from, a series of steel tubes concealed in the walls; the mezzanine is attached on one side to a steel beam, and hung at two other points from rods attached to the roof structure. Photo by: Adam Friedberg
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  Brad Smith’s compact former coach house, tucked away in one of London’s many hidden cobbled mews, got a radical overhaul from Scape Architects. Carving out every possible nook for storage, the staircase acts as both room divider and organizer. The stair “carpet” is made from the same tough rubber that is used to make tires for semis. Photo by: Peter Marlow
    Brad Smith’s compact former coach house, tucked away in one of London’s many hidden cobbled mews, got a radical overhaul from Scape Architects. Carving out every possible nook for storage, the staircase acts as both room divider and organizer. The stair “carpet” is made from the same tough rubber that is used to make tires for semis. Photo by: Peter Marlow
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  When it comes to material originality, this former tavern in Chicago’s trendy Bucktown neighborhood pulls out all the stops. Gut-renovated by local firm Wilkinson Blender Architecture, the house is also comprehensively green. Photo by: Doug Fogelson/DRFP
    When it comes to material originality, this former tavern in Chicago’s trendy Bucktown neighborhood pulls out all the stops. Gut-renovated by local firm Wilkinson Blender Architecture, the house is also comprehensively green. Photo by: Doug Fogelson/DRFP

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