Ray Eames 101

written by:
December 17, 2013
In honor of the 101st birthday of Ray Eames last weekend (Happy birthday, Ray!), we present a look back at our past coverage of the design legend.
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  Ray Eames in the Eames House living room, Christmas 1949. The couple moved in on Christmas Eve with very little and furnished the home slowly over the ensuing decades. Photo courtesy the Eames Foundation. 

    Ray Eames in the Eames House living room, Christmas 1949. The couple moved in on Christmas Eve with very little and furnished the home slowly over the ensuing decades. Photo courtesy the Eames Foundation. 

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  The Eames house living room as it is best known, shot in 1994. The light from the window illuminates the tumbleweed the couple picked up on their honeymoon drive from Chicago to Los Angeles; due to its fragility it was the only item not to have been moved to the LACMA exhibition. Photo courtesy Tim Street-Porter.

    The Eames house living room as it is best known, shot in 1994. The light from the window illuminates the tumbleweed the couple picked up on their honeymoon drive from Chicago to Los Angeles; due to its fragility it was the only item not to have been moved to the LACMA exhibition. Photo courtesy Tim Street-Porter.

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  The living room in 1994 from the outside looking in, the angle from which most visitors view the space. Ray bordered the house with potted plants, which remain outside today. Photo courtesy Tim Street-Porter. 

    The living room in 1994 from the outside looking in, the angle from which most visitors view the space. Ray bordered the house with potted plants, which remain outside today. Photo courtesy Tim Street-Porter. 

  • 
  Dwell features Eames furniture often, and it can be all too easy to see Charles and Ray Eames as an indivisible unit: they worked together, dressed similarly, and by all accounts had a perfectly happy marriage. But, it is important to recognize both of them as independent minds and partners, here Dwell turns the spotlight on Ray. 

    Dwell features Eames furniture often, and it can be all too easy to see Charles and Ray Eames as an indivisible unit: they worked together, dressed similarly, and by all accounts had a perfectly happy marriage. But, it is important to recognize both of them as independent minds and partners, here Dwell turns the spotlight on Ray

  • 
  Here are a quartet of our favorite Eames films—three made by Charles and Ray and one more of them introducing their legendary lounge chair on NBC. You know the designers, now get a taste for the filmmakers.

    Here are a quartet of our favorite Eames films—three made by Charles and Ray and one more of them introducing their legendary lounge chair on NBC. You know the designers, now get a taste for the filmmakers.

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  Charles and Ray Eames designed this elephant in 1945. The complex process required for molding the plywood pieces was prohibitive, however, and the elephant never made it past the prototype stage. Vitra revived the beast in polypropylene, making it durable enough to handle the wilds of the backyard, playroom, or even southern California. 

    Charles and Ray Eames designed this elephant in 1945. The complex process required for molding the plywood pieces was prohibitive, however, and the elephant never made it past the prototype stage. Vitra revived the beast in polypropylene, making it durable enough to handle the wilds of the backyard, playroom, or even southern California. 

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  At the A+D Museum's Eames Words exhibition, beneath a rebus Charles created for his daughter, Lucia, when she was a child, is "Ray's table." The table was curated by artist Tina Beebe, who worked closely with Ray in the Eames Office and decorated the surface with the flowers and objects Ray favored. 

    At the A+D Museum's Eames Words exhibition, beneath a rebus Charles created for his daughter, Lucia, when she was a child, is "Ray's table." The table was curated by artist Tina Beebe, who worked closely with Ray in the Eames Office and decorated the surface with the flowers and objects Ray favored. 

  • 
  The original color composition of the Hang-It-All was created by Ray Eames. Here, it hangs in an architect's Sacramento remodel. In celebration of what would have been her 100th birthday last December, Vitra and the Eames Office launched three new versions of the coat rack. The models feature fresh hues of red, green and white, and represent excerpts of the new Vitra Color Library.   Courtesy of Mike Graffigna 2010
mike@mikegraffigna.com
415.200.0028.

    The original color composition of the Hang-It-All was created by Ray Eames. Here, it hangs in an architect's Sacramento remodel. In celebration of what would have been her 100th birthday last December, Vitra and the Eames Office launched three new versions of the coat rack. The models feature fresh hues of red, green and white, and represent excerpts of the new Vitra Color Library. 

    Courtesy of Mike Graffigna 2010 mike@mikegraffigna.com 415.200.0028.
  • 
  To a standing-room-only crowd at Dwell on Design 2013, Charles and Ray's grandson, Eames Demetrios, presented Ray Eames 101, in which he shared never-before-seen images of the artist and her work.

    To a standing-room-only crowd at Dwell on Design 2013, Charles and Ray's grandson, Eames Demetrios, presented Ray Eames 101, in which he shared never-before-seen images of the artist and her work.

  • 
  At Dwell on Design 2011, we showed unseen films from the Eames vault. 

    At Dwell on Design 2011, we showed unseen films from the Eames vault

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