Number Five: A Co-Working Space in Venice Beach

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July 27, 2013
In an industrial loft just off Rose Avenue in Venice Beach—where creative shops, innovative restaurants, juice bars and trendy yoga studios abound—is a co-working space called Number Five. Read Full Article
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  The Number Five co-working space is shared by Paul Anderson and Brett Woitunski of Yardwork Co., Mathew Gerson, who turns ideas into viable businesses (his last venture was Sir Richard’s Condoms), and Domenica Peterson, a couture seamstress who also runs the non­profit Global Action Through Fashion. Photo by Marc Alt

    The Number Five co-working space is shared by Paul Anderson and Brett Woitunski of Yardwork Co., Mathew Gerson, who turns ideas into viable businesses (his last venture was Sir Richard’s Condoms), and Domenica Peterson, a couture seamstress who also runs the non­profit Global Action Through Fashion. Photo by Marc Alt

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  The bartop downstairs was salvaged from a church that was being torn down in the Southbay. Mathew Gerson, Brett Woitunsky and Paul Anderson built the bartop, and the steel legs are by Matthew Deters of Deterfabrik, a furniture fabricator who works in the space below Number Five. The post and beam holding it up are from the teardown across the alley. The steel/leather swoop chair and drop light are also built by Deters. Photo by Yardwork Co.

    The bartop downstairs was salvaged from a church that was being torn down in the Southbay. Mathew Gerson, Brett Woitunsky and Paul Anderson built the bartop, and the steel legs are by Matthew Deters of Deterfabrik, a furniture fabricator who works in the space below Number Five. The post and beam holding it up are from the teardown across the alley. The steel/leather swoop chair and drop light are also built by Deters. Photo by Yardwork Co.

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  On the lower level of the space, Swedish designer Arne Norell’s "Ari" chair, designed in 1966, can be found on one of the common areas. Photo by Yardwork Co.

    On the lower level of the space, Swedish designer Arne Norell’s "Ari" chair, designed in 1966, can be found on one of the common areas. Photo by Yardwork Co.

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  Woitunski and Anderson say. “We’re surrounded by a lot of artists, furniture makers, and an underground restaurant, so it’s an unconventional space to work, but definitely inspiring. If anything else, it’s a great place to get critical feedback on things we are working on.” Photo by Marc Alt

    Woitunski and Anderson say. “We’re surrounded by a lot of artists, furniture makers, and an underground restaurant, so it’s an unconventional space to work, but definitely inspiring. If anything else, it’s a great place to get critical feedback on things we are working on.” Photo by Marc Alt

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  Much of the material used in the two-level space is reclaimed, from construction sites in the neighborhood (sometimes the result of dumpster diving excursions), flea markets and online resale sites. Photo by Marc Alt

    Much of the material used in the two-level space is reclaimed, from construction sites in the neighborhood (sometimes the result of dumpster diving excursions), flea markets and online resale sites. Photo by Marc Alt

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  Venice has always been a community that embraces art, grit and anything that’s a bit rough around the edges. This, Anderson and Woitunski say, has always been the foundation of the local culture and the way people have created their spaces in the area. Photo by Marc Alt

    Venice has always been a community that embraces art, grit and anything that’s a bit rough around the edges. This, Anderson and Woitunski say, has always been the foundation of the local culture and the way people have created their spaces in the area. Photo by Marc Alt

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  Transforming a space on the fly with virtually no budget is no easy feat, but proved to be an interesting creative challenge. “We wanted to get the space up and running quickly to be able to work and host meetings and events,” Anderson and Woitunsky say. “The time and budgetary constraints made for solid creative urgency it actually helped us make decisions throughout the process.” Photo by Yardwork Co.

    Transforming a space on the fly with virtually no budget is no easy feat, but proved to be an interesting creative challenge. “We wanted to get the space up and running quickly to be able to work and host meetings and events,” Anderson and Woitunsky say. “The time and budgetary constraints made for solid creative urgency it actually helped us make decisions throughout the process.” Photo by Yardwork Co.

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  “The old wood from the surrounding structures has much more character than anything you can buy new,” say Yardwork Co’s Anderson and Woitunsky. “We’re thrifty so we love doing it, but it’s also nice to know that this stuff is getting used again.” Photo by Marc Alt

    “The old wood from the surrounding structures has much more character than anything you can buy new,” say Yardwork Co’s Anderson and Woitunsky. “We’re thrifty so we love doing it, but it’s also nice to know that this stuff is getting used again.” Photo by Marc Alt

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  The Number Five space has plenty of common areas for creative collaboration, including a “library” on the upper level. The railings around the mezzanine are built by Matthew Deters, a furniture fabricator who works in the space below and often creates custom pieces for Yardwork Co’s projects. Photo by Yardwork Co.

    The Number Five space has plenty of common areas for creative collaboration, including a “library” on the upper level. The railings around the mezzanine are built by Matthew Deters, a furniture fabricator who works in the space below and often creates custom pieces for Yardwork Co’s projects. Photo by Yardwork Co.

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  In the same way that Venice embraces an eclectic mix of old and new, the creators of the Number Five space wanted to blend these neighborhood aspects to form a space that would express and embrace this “in an intentional and useful way.” Photo by Marc Alt

    In the same way that Venice embraces an eclectic mix of old and new, the creators of the Number Five space wanted to blend these neighborhood aspects to form a space that would express and embrace this “in an intentional and useful way.” Photo by Marc Alt

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  The space is constantly evolving, and the intention is to make Number Five come alive and as a neighborhood hub for creative collaboration. Photo by Yardwork Co.

    The space is constantly evolving, and the intention is to make Number Five come alive and as a neighborhood hub for creative collaboration. Photo by Yardwork Co.

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  The shelves in Yardwork Co’s space upstairs are made from wood reclaimed from various sites around Venice. Everything except Woitunsky and Anderson’s desks (which are new plywood and steel) is made from found materials. Photo by Marc Alt

    The shelves in Yardwork Co’s space upstairs are made from wood reclaimed from various sites around Venice. Everything except Woitunsky and Anderson’s desks (which are new plywood and steel) is made from found materials. Photo by Marc Alt

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  “Most of the core structure; including the industrial stairs, lofted area and railings were here,” Anderson and Woitunski say, “but all of the walls were painted flat gray. It felt a little like a big, cave­like storage area, but the unique structure gave us a really good starting point. The previous tenants were steel fabricators, so there was an inherent industrial feel to the elements they had installed.” Photo by Yardwork Co.

    “Most of the core structure; including the industrial stairs, lofted area and railings were here,” Anderson and Woitunski say, “but all of the walls were painted flat gray. It felt a little like a big, cave­like storage area, but the unique structure gave us a really good starting point. The previous tenants were steel fabricators, so there was an inherent industrial feel to the elements they had installed.” Photo by Yardwork Co.

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  Mathew Gerson’s husky is an unofficial member of the Number Five co-working collective in Venice. Photo by Marc Alt

    Mathew Gerson’s husky is an unofficial member of the Number Five co-working collective in Venice. Photo by Marc Alt

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