The Most Popular Homes in Dwell: 41-60

written by:
February 12, 2013
We published and you read. Here's part three of our series on the most popular homes ever featured in Dwell. Find 1-20 here and 21-40 here. Flip through the following slideshow for 41-60, which features modern houses from Brooklyn to Great Britain, renovations to prefab, and more.
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  A House Grows in BrooklynWhile most people living in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn didn’t see much to love about an abandoned, weedy lot squeezed between two old town houses, one couple couldn’t help but see it as an opportunity to finally build their own home. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    A House Grows in Brooklyn

    While most people living in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn didn’t see much to love about an abandoned, weedy lot squeezed between two old town houses, one couple couldn’t help but see it as an opportunity to finally build their own home. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Looking InwardFor Paul and Shoko Shozi, a pair of retiring Angelenos, the goal was to shut out the neighborhood but bring in the sunny skies. Their new prefab home, the Tatami House, designed by Swiss architect Roger Kurath of Design*21, makes a central courtyard the physical, and maybe even the spiritual, center of the home. On a fine Marina del Rey morning, Paul shows us around. Photo by Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao.  Photo by: Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao
    Looking Inward

    For Paul and Shoko Shozi, a pair of retiring Angelenos, the goal was to shut out the neighborhood but bring in the sunny skies. Their new prefab home, the Tatami House, designed by Swiss architect Roger Kurath of Design*21, makes a central courtyard the physical, and maybe even the spiritual, center of the home. On a fine Marina del Rey morning, Paul shows us around. Photo by Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao.

    Photo by: Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao

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  Knotty by NatureIn snowy Sweden, where pine planks and the democratic design incubator Ikea reign supreme, a local architect pays homage to his patrimony, making a small, slatty home feel like a rather big deal. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin
    Knotty by Nature

    In snowy Sweden, where pine planks and the democratic design incubator Ikea reign supreme, a local architect pays homage to his patrimony, making a small, slatty home feel like a rather big deal. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  Windows VistaWhen artists Ramona Trent and Anthony Pearson teamed up with architects Escher GuneWardena for a full-scale renovation, they bestowed a remarkable view upon an unremarkable bungalow. Photo by Noah Webb.  Photo by: Noah Webb
    Windows Vista

    When artists Ramona Trent and Anthony Pearson teamed up with architects Escher GuneWardena for a full-scale renovation, they bestowed a remarkable view upon an unremarkable bungalow. Photo by Noah Webb.

    Photo by: Noah Webb

  • 
  University Place ApartmentAfter a young couple purchased an apartment in New York City's Greenwich Village, they turned to Matthew Miller of local firm StudioLAB to rescue its dark, closed-off interiors.
    University Place Apartment

    After a young couple purchased an apartment in New York City's Greenwich Village, they turned to Matthew Miller of local firm StudioLAB to rescue its dark, closed-off interiors.

  • 
  A New SlantIn Seattle, where others saw only a severe slope and lack of municipal hookups, one couple spotted their ticket to their dream home. Photo by Philip Newton.  Photo by: Philip Newton
    A New Slant

    In Seattle, where others saw only a severe slope and lack of municipal hookups, one couple spotted their ticket to their dream home. Photo by Philip Newton.

    Photo by: Philip Newton

  • 
  Chef's TableWhen two full-time foodies renovated their Chicago condo, getting the kitchen right meant finding the right kitchen island. Photo by Matthew Williams.  Photo by: Matthew Williams
    Chef's Table

    When two full-time foodies renovated their Chicago condo, getting the kitchen right meant finding the right kitchen island. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

  • 
  A Simple PlanA Marmol Radziner–designed prefab house, trucked onto a remote Northern California site, takes the pain out of the construction process. Photo by Dwight Eschliman.  Photo by: Dwight Eschliman
    A Simple Plan

    A Marmol Radziner–designed prefab house, trucked onto a remote Northern California site, takes the pain out of the construction process. Photo by Dwight Eschliman.

    Photo by: Dwight Eschliman

  • 
  A Lot to LoveIn a leafy residential area a few miles from downtown Kansas City, Missouri, an enterprising architect saw opportunity where others saw trouble. He took a sloping, triangular lot and designed a new home for his growing family—an open, tree house–like structure on stilts that hovers at the quirky edge of a conventional neighborhood. Photo by Mike Sinclair.  Photo by: Mike Sinclair
    A Lot to Love

    In a leafy residential area a few miles from downtown Kansas City, Missouri, an enterprising architect saw opportunity where others saw trouble. He took a sloping, triangular lot and designed a new home for his growing family—an open, tree house–like structure on stilts that hovers at the quirky edge of a conventional neighborhood. Photo by Mike Sinclair.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

  • 
  Barns EnnobledSubverting the traditional, conservatively cozy British barn conversion, Carl Turner created a getaway in rural Norfolk for himself and his friends to visit, repose, and consider the beauty of agrarian minimalism. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    Barns Ennobled

    Subverting the traditional, conservatively cozy British barn conversion, Carl Turner created a getaway in rural Norfolk for himself and his friends to visit, repose, and consider the beauty of agrarian minimalism. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

  • 
  Packed Naturally"It's not about being 'green' or 'cool' or making a monument; it's about the fundamentals of architecture," architect Cass Calder Smith says about the rammed earth Palo Alto residence he designed.  Photo by: Joe FletcherCourtesy of: Joe Fletcher Photography ©2010
    Packed Naturally

    "It's not about being 'green' or 'cool' or making a monument; it's about the fundamentals of architecture," architect Cass Calder Smith says about the rammed earth Palo Alto residence he designed.

    Photo by: Joe Fletcher

    Courtesy of: Joe Fletcher Photography ©2010

  • 
  Scrap House"Repurpose, refurbish, recycle" was the guiding principle for a metals broker in Ontario who harnessed his passion for–and knowledge of–industrial materials to create a new house from old scrap. Photo by Lorne Bridgman.  Photo by: Lorne Bridgman
    Scrap House

    "Repurpose, refurbish, recycle" was the guiding principle for a metals broker in Ontario who harnessed his passion for–and knowledge of–industrial materials to create a new house from old scrap. Photo by Lorne Bridgman.

    Photo by: Lorne Bridgman

  • 
  Hygge HouseIn a former fishermen’s cottage outside Copenhagen, a young family has carved out a cozy, light-filled home. Photo by Jonas Bjerre-Polsen.  Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen
    Hygge House

    In a former fishermen’s cottage outside Copenhagen, a young family has carved out a cozy, light-filled home. Photo by Jonas Bjerre-Polsen.

    Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

  • 
  Living RoomWhen Im and David Schafer moved in together they faced the challenge of combining the contents of David’s 880-square-foot loft and Im’s 550-square-foot apartment into a one-room, 426-square-foot downtown loft.  Photo by: Misha Gravenor
    Living Room

    When Im and David Schafer moved in together they faced the challenge of combining the contents of David’s 880-square-foot loft and Im’s 550-square-foot apartment into a one-room, 426-square-foot downtown loft.

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

  • 
  Family TreeFor this San Diego family, the phrase "putting down roots" has taken on a whole new meaning.  Photo by: Noah Webb
    Family Tree

    For this San Diego family, the phrase "putting down roots" has taken on a whole new meaning.

    Photo by: Noah Webb

  • 
  The Floating House, Lake HuronOn the edge of a tiny island accessible only by boat, this buoyant summer home lives the life aquatic. Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    The Floating House, Lake Huron

    On the edge of a tiny island accessible only by boat, this buoyant summer home lives the life aquatic. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

  • 
  Bringing It All Back HomeRelying on local materials, local craftsmen, and the land her family has farmed for over two centuries, a New Yorker rediscovers her Midwestern roots. Photo by Kyoko Hamada.  Photo by: Kyoko Hamada
    Bringing It All Back Home

    Relying on local materials, local craftsmen, and the land her family has farmed for over two centuries, a New Yorker rediscovers her Midwestern roots. Photo by Kyoko Hamada.

    Photo by: Kyoko Hamada

  • 
  The Design TradeIn a South Minneapolis neighborhood of century-old housing stock, Julie Snow’s bold but elegant residential design fulfilled Andrew Blauvelt and Scott Winter’s desire for a loft on the ground. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean KaufmanCourtesy of: Dean Kaufman 2010
    The Design Trade

    In a South Minneapolis neighborhood of century-old housing stock, Julie Snow’s bold but elegant residential design fulfilled Andrew Blauvelt and Scott Winter’s desire for a loft on the ground. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Courtesy of: Dean Kaufman 2010

  • 
  Snug as a BugPart tent, part RV, the NASA-inspired Cricket Trailer is the go-to camper for the modern road tripper. Photo by Sarah Wilson.  Photo by: Sarah Wilson
    Snug as a Bug

    Part tent, part RV, the NASA-inspired Cricket Trailer is the go-to camper for the modern road tripper. Photo by Sarah Wilson.

    Photo by: Sarah Wilson

  • 
  From Brown to GreenToronto designers Peter Fleming and Debbie Adams found a polluted lot and a run-down building­—and saw fertile ground for a unique, eco-minded new home. Photo by Lorne Bridgman.  Photo by: Lorne Bridgman
    From Brown to Green

    Toronto designers Peter Fleming and Debbie Adams found a polluted lot and a run-down building­—and saw fertile ground for a unique, eco-minded new home. Photo by Lorne Bridgman.

    Photo by: Lorne Bridgman

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