Advertising
Advertising

You are here

A Mondrian-Inspired NYC Apartment

Read Article
Taking cues from Piet Mondrian's iconic Broadway Boogie Woogie painting, architect and critic Joseph Giovannini recasts a New York City studio apartment.
  • 
  Taking cues from Piet Mondrian's iconic Broadway Boogie Woogie painting, architect and critic Joseph Giovannini recasts a New York City studio apartment.  Photo by: Eduard Hueber

    Taking cues from Piet Mondrian's iconic Broadway Boogie Woogie painting, architect and critic Joseph Giovannini recasts a New York City studio apartment.

    Photo by: Eduard Hueber

  • 
  Mondrian's piece interprets the rhythm of New York—music from the 1940s, the street grid, and overall pace—and Giovannini sought to capture the same elements in the apartment.  Photo by: Eduard Hueber

    Mondrian's piece interprets the rhythm of New York—music from the 1940s, the street grid, and overall pace—and Giovannini sought to capture the same elements in the apartment.

    Photo by: Eduard Hueber

  • 
  There aren't great views to the outside, so Giovannini made an interior "view" using architectural elements. "With a budget of only $15,000, I had to be strategic, and using sheet rock and plywood, worked off the existing beams and columns to create light alcoves that 'broke the box' by suppressing its corners," he says. "The idea was to expand space, and I did so by 'architecturalizing' light—that is, bringing light into space, redefining the space simply with strip fluorescents."  Photo by: Eduard Hueber

    There aren't great views to the outside, so Giovannini made an interior "view" using architectural elements. "With a budget of only $15,000, I had to be strategic, and using sheet rock and plywood, worked off the existing beams and columns to create light alcoves that 'broke the box' by suppressing its corners," he says. "The idea was to expand space, and I did so by 'architecturalizing' light—that is, bringing light into space, redefining the space simply with strip fluorescents."

    Photo by: Eduard Hueber

  • 
  "I wanted to activate the whole space with these colors," says Giovannini noting that from every angle in the petite 425-square-foot studio, one can spy the accents. "The painting 'paints' itself as you move around and interacts with the space."  Photo by: Eduard Hueber

    "I wanted to activate the whole space with these colors," says Giovannini noting that from every angle in the petite 425-square-foot studio, one can spy the accents. "The painting 'paints' itself as you move around and interacts with the space."

    Photo by: Eduard Hueber

  • 
  Sliding doors disguise the small Pullman kitchen. "Painting the sliding doors meant that my daughter could paint and repaint the apartment just by positioning the doors into new combinations," says Giovannini.  Photo by: Eduard Hueber

    Sliding doors disguise the small Pullman kitchen. "Painting the sliding doors meant that my daughter could paint and repaint the apartment just by positioning the doors into new combinations," says Giovannini.

    Photo by: Eduard Hueber

@current / @total

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising