Modern Design in Japan: 5 Intuitive Interiors

written by:
July 21, 2013
The clean-cut lines and proximity to nature that have defined Japanese design for centuries combine with modernist minimalism in these five homes.
  • 
  A vacation home in the forest of Agatsuma-gun is elevated 6.5 meters off of the ground, a man-made nest perched on stilts above a ground-level patio. The smooth wood paneling and the minimalistic design of the home’s upper floor recall the simplicity of the natural world, and the glass plate that tops the dining table pulls the reflections of surrounding trees into the house. Photo by Go Hasegawa.   Photo by: Go Hasegawa

    A vacation home in the forest of Agatsuma-gun is elevated 6.5 meters off of the ground, a man-made nest perched on stilts above a ground-level patio. The smooth wood paneling and the minimalistic design of the home’s upper floor recall the simplicity of the natural world, and the glass plate that tops the dining table pulls the reflections of surrounding trees into the house. 

    Photo by Go Hasegawa

    Photo by: Go Hasegawa

  • 
  Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. Photo by Ryota Atarashi. 

    Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. 

    Photo by Ryota Atarashi. 

  • 
  With an elegant modern aesthetic and all the coziness of a robin’s nest, a family home on the island of Onomichi embraces its environment rather than shutting it out. Photo by Hiroshi Ueda.  Photo by: Hiroshi Ueda

    With an elegant modern aesthetic and all the coziness of a robin’s nest, a family home on the island of Onomichi embraces its environment rather than shutting it out. 

    Photo by Hiroshi Ueda.

    Photo by: Hiroshi Ueda

  • 
  Architect Akihis Hirata made the most of 921 square feet when designing the Tokyo home pictured here; the house is defined by one long, sprawling staircase with larger landings every few steps that make up individual rooms. Photo by Koichi Torimura.   Photo by: Koichi Torimura

    Architect Akihis Hirata made the most of 921 square feet when designing the Tokyo home pictured here; the house is defined by one long, sprawling staircase with larger landings every few steps that make up individual rooms. 

    Photo by Koichi Torimura

    Photo by: Koichi Torimura

  • 
  To comply with the spatial restrictions of urban living, Tokyo architect Yuko Shibata designed her apartment to be adjustable. The wall that separates the dining room from the home office can slide to the left to create a larger common room when the workday is over. Photo by Ryohei Hamada.  Photo by: Ryohei Hamada

    To comply with the spatial restrictions of urban living, Tokyo architect Yuko Shibata designed her apartment to be adjustable. The wall that separates the dining room from the home office can slide to the left to create a larger common room when the workday is over. 

    Photo by Ryohei Hamada.

    Photo by: Ryohei Hamada

@current / @total

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...