A Look at Staircases

written by:
February 1, 2013
  • 
  For his renovated apartment inside a nineteenth-century palace in Vilnius, Lithuania, architect Rytis Mikulionis designed a white steel staircase to lead from the living area up to the bedroom platform. He assembled it by bending thick sheets of metal and applying thin boards of stained oak. It rises about seven feet and has no banisters. Read the full article here.  Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.   This originally appeared in Palace Intrigue.

    For his renovated apartment inside a nineteenth-century palace in Vilnius, Lithuania, architect Rytis Mikulionis designed a white steel staircase to lead from the living area up to the bedroom platform. He assembled it by bending thick sheets of metal and applying thin boards of stained oak. It rises about seven feet and has no banisters. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
    This originally appeared in Palace Intrigue.
  • 
  Yang Yeo descends the spiral staircase that connects the public and private spaces inside his house in Singapore’s Joo Chiat neighborhood. The building, an 85-year-old shophouse, is quite narrow and very deep—about 16 by 68 feet. Read the full article here.  Photo by Richard Powers.   This originally appeared in Straight and Narrow.

    Yang Yeo descends the spiral staircase that connects the public and private spaces inside his house in Singapore’s Joo Chiat neighborhood. The building, an 85-year-old shophouse, is quite narrow and very deep—about 16 by 68 feet. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Richard Powers.
    This originally appeared in Straight and Narrow.
  • 
  There wasn’t enough room for a conventional stairway on artist Tad Beck's Los Angeles roof deck, so designer Riley Pratt chose an industrial model from Lapeyre Stair, a New Orleans–based manufacturer. Its alternating tread design makes walking up a cinch—even for Beck’s Lab mix, Little Bear. Beck recalls that when he told the company he wanted a stairway for his home, they weren’t interested in selling to him. But he persevered and called back the next day and said he needed it for his warehouse, and the order went right through. Read the full article here.  Courtesy of Dave Lauridsen.

    There wasn’t enough room for a conventional stairway on artist Tad Beck's Los Angeles roof deck, so designer Riley Pratt chose an industrial model from Lapeyre Stair, a New Orleans–based manufacturer. Its alternating tread design makes walking up a cinch—even for Beck’s Lab mix, Little Bear. Beck recalls that when he told the company he wanted a stairway for his home, they weren’t interested in selling to him. But he persevered and called back the next day and said he needed it for his warehouse, and the order went right through. Read the full article here.

    Courtesy of Dave Lauridsen.
  • 
  “The stair [by Lapeyre Stair] is very cost-effective, as compared to building woodwork,” explains Wonbo Woo, whose father, architect Kyu Sung Woo, transformed a cramped New York apartment into a loft for him. “It occupies very little space, and you can come down without holding the rail.” Of the small gap that reveals the kitchen, he says, “That’s very important, to give a sense of continuous space.” Read the full article here.  Photo by Adam Friedberg.   This originally appeared in Big City, Little Loft.

    “The stair [by Lapeyre Stair] is very cost-effective, as compared to building woodwork,” explains Wonbo Woo, whose father, architect Kyu Sung Woo, transformed a cramped New York apartment into a loft for him. “It occupies very little space, and you can come down without holding the rail.” Of the small gap that reveals the kitchen, he says, “That’s very important, to give a sense of continuous space.” Read the full article here.

    Photo by Adam Friedberg.
    This originally appeared in Big City, Little Loft.
  • 
  Im and David Schafer's one-room, 426-square-foot loft in downtown San Diego features a stairway to the sleeping loft that's a riff on a ship's ladder: "We spent a lot of time figuring out how much space we need to maneuver," says David. "It allowed us to make it as small and perfect as we wanted to." Instead of a handrail, sail cleats are bolted to the walls as hand-holds. Read the full article here.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.   This originally appeared in Living Room.

    Im and David Schafer's one-room, 426-square-foot loft in downtown San Diego features a stairway to the sleeping loft that's a riff on a ship's ladder: "We spent a lot of time figuring out how much space we need to maneuver," says David. "It allowed us to make it as small and perfect as we wanted to." Instead of a handrail, sail cleats are bolted to the walls as hand-holds. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    This originally appeared in Living Room.
  • 
  Inside Greg Reitz's Los Angeles home, the entryway features fly-ash concrete floors and stairs cut from recycled steel. Conscious of the life-cycle of the materials he chose, he settled steel instead of wood on the grounds that it would last longer and would not harbor termites or mold. Read the full article here.  Photo by Robert Gregory.   This originally appeared in Taking His Own Advice.

    Inside Greg Reitz's Los Angeles home, the entryway features fly-ash concrete floors and stairs cut from recycled steel. Conscious of the life-cycle of the materials he chose, he settled steel instead of wood on the grounds that it would last longer and would not harbor termites or mold. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Robert Gregory.
    This originally appeared in Taking His Own Advice.
  • 
  Becca and Doug Worple have a vacation house on a horseshoe-shaped island on Lake Huron in Ontario, Canada. Architect Michael Meredith of MOS created stairs that feature a geometric pattern of holes generated by a software script that allows rain to slip through to the lake below. Read the full article here.  Photo by Raimund Koch.   This originally appeared in Floating House, Lake Huron.

    Becca and Doug Worple have a vacation house on a horseshoe-shaped island on Lake Huron in Ontario, Canada. Architect Michael Meredith of MOS created stairs that feature a geometric pattern of holes generated by a software script that allows rain to slip through to the lake below. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Raimund Koch.
    This originally appeared in Floating House, Lake Huron.
  • 
  Inside his renovated 140-year-old farmhouse in Pittsburgh, Jeff Walz installed unfinished, black, welded-steel railing borders for steps made of framing lumber, which emit a friendly, old-fashioned creak as Walz treads up and down. Read the full article here.  Photo by Livia Corona.   This originally appeared in Pittsburgh Steeler.

    Inside his renovated 140-year-old farmhouse in Pittsburgh, Jeff Walz installed unfinished, black, welded-steel railing borders for steps made of framing lumber, which emit a friendly, old-fashioned creak as Walz treads up and down. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Livia Corona.
    This originally appeared in Pittsburgh Steeler.
  • 
  Darcy Miro and her husband, Lars Weiss, built a four-story town house in Brooklyn. For the banisters and railings around their reading loft, they selected aluminum-magnesium Speed-Rail. They liked the “inexpensive industrial” look it provided, explains Miro, and that it seemed “smooth, sturdy, and honest.” The system consists of lengths of pipe and prefabricated brackets that simply slip together and tighten with set screws. Read the full article here.  Courtesy of Dean Kaufman.

    Darcy Miro and her husband, Lars Weiss, built a four-story town house in Brooklyn. For the banisters and railings around their reading loft, they selected aluminum-magnesium Speed-Rail. They liked the “inexpensive industrial” look it provided, explains Miro, and that it seemed “smooth, sturdy, and honest.” The system consists of lengths of pipe and prefabricated brackets that simply slip together and tighten with set screws. Read the full article here.

    Courtesy of Dean Kaufman.
  • 
  The stairs going up the knoll to a roof garden and to an Anchorage, Alaska, house’s second-level entrance are made from Cor-Ten steel risers (which develop a rich, rusted patina) and are filled with gravel in order to create a nonslip surface that drains well. The steel and steelwork is by Virginia Industrial. Read the full article here.  Photo by Prakash Patel. Courtesy of Dave Lauridsen.  This originally appeared in Time Is on My Site.

    The stairs going up the knoll to a roof garden and to an Anchorage, Alaska, house’s second-level entrance are made from Cor-Ten steel risers (which develop a rich, rusted patina) and are filled with gravel in order to create a nonslip surface that drains well. The steel and steelwork is by Virginia Industrial. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Prakash Patel. Courtesy of Dave Lauridsen.
    This originally appeared in Time Is on My Site.
  • 
  To lead up to the master bedroom inside their Santa Monica, California, residence, husband-and-wife architecture team Lawrence Scarpa and Angela Brooks created a perforated metal staircase, lit from above, that casts a Sigmar Polke–like shadow grid on the concrete floor. Read the full article here.  Photo by Marvin Rand. Courtesy of Darcy Hemley.  This originally appeared in Solar Inspiration.

    To lead up to the master bedroom inside their Santa Monica, California, residence, husband-and-wife architecture team Lawrence Scarpa and Angela Brooks created a perforated metal staircase, lit from above, that casts a Sigmar Polke–like shadow grid on the concrete floor. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Marvin Rand. Courtesy of Darcy Hemley.
    This originally appeared in Solar Inspiration.
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