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February 1, 2013
Ah, the beauty of bathing in the breeze. Here we present our some of our favorite outdoor showers from issues past.
Queenstown gets cold in winter, hence the installation of a sauna. Outside, the landscaping was kept deliberately casual, with rock walls and gravel paths.

On the shores of New Zealand’s Lake Wakatipu, architects Bronwen Kerr and Pete Ritchie designed a home for themselves and their children. Queenstown gets cold in winter, hence the installation of a sauna. Outside, the landscaping was kept deliberately casual, with rock walls and gravel paths. Read the full article here.

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Originally appeared in Nature Nurtured
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Norwegian summers are short, and it’s customary to spend as much time outdoors as possible," says Kari K. Holm, who with her husband, German-born architect Jürgen Kiehl, created a residence in the remote area of Hanko, Norway. <a href="http://www.dwell.co

Norwegian summers are short, and it’s customary to spend as much time outdoors as possible," says Kari K. Holm, who with her husband, German-born architect Jürgen Kiehl, created a residence in the remote area of Hanko, Norway. Read the full article here.

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The glass and wood walls of the bathhouse, like other retractable panels on the house, 
offer shade with a view.

The residence of architect Brian Zulaikha and artist Janet Laurence, in Balmain Point, Australia, features a glass-and-wood outdoor bathhouse. “I was determined that as much of it [the house] would be as open as possible,” Zulaikha states, something they achieved through a series of sliding glazed doors that allow the outdoor rooms to be open, closed, and all variations in between. Read the full article here.

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Originally appeared in A Measured Approach
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Mimicking the cantilever of the house, an outdoor shower just off the master bedroom stretches out gently toward the surrounding woods.

Peter and Mark Anderson, of Anderson Anderson Architecture, created Cantilever House, a prefab in Granite Falls, Wisonsin, for Scott Stafne. Mimicking the cantilever of the house, an outdoor shower just off the master bedroom stretches out gently toward the surrounding woods. Read the full article here.

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Originally appeared in On a Rock in a Hard Place
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The balcony is notable for its outdoor shower.

Nina Tolstrup, the Danish furniture and product designer, who works under the name Studiomama, lives in a lively part of London’s Bethnal Green. The fact that there’s an outdoor shower on the balcony—not something you tend to see in this part of town—adds to the interior’s contemporary Scandinavian feel. Read the full article here.

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Originally appeared in A Mama's Touch
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The evening bath is a ritual in Japan, and public baths are still around, but this is a new twist. Moriyama curtains the bath during use, but won’t cover any other windows, “because it feels good to couple the inner space with the outside world.”

On a double suburban lot in Tokyo, the Office of Ryue Nishizawa built a neighborhood-scaled, flexible-format minimalist steel prefab compound for Yasuo Moriyama—a very private individual with a powerful social bent—and six rental tenants. The evening bath is a ritual in Japan, and public baths are still around, but this is a new twist. Moriyama curtains the bath during use, but won’t cover any other windows, "because it feels good to couple the inner space with the outside world." Read the full article here.

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Originally appeared in Building Blocks
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"Personally, I’d rather be living outside,” says architect David Hertz, who created a compound—four dwellings connected by bridges and clustered around a courtyard lap pool—for himself and his family in Venice, California. Sophie, 11, rinses off in the outdoor shower made from 12-by-12-inch Syndecrete tiles cut into 3-by-3-inch squares, which Hertz intentionally set so that they appear to undulate. The sink is from Boffi; the shower fixtures are Arne Jacobsen for Vola. Read the full article here.

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Queenstown gets cold in winter, hence the installation of a sauna. Outside, the landscaping was kept deliberately casual, with rock walls and gravel paths.

On the shores of New Zealand’s Lake Wakatipu, architects Bronwen Kerr and Pete Ritchie designed a home for themselves and their children. Queenstown gets cold in winter, hence the installation of a sauna. Outside, the landscaping was kept deliberately casual, with rock walls and gravel paths. Read the full article here.

Photo by Stephen Oxenbury.

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