written by:
March 7, 2013
These hallways don't need a red carpet to grab your attention. Take a look at these stretching indoor and outdoor corridors.
Bunkhouse interior hallway

This Texan abode is made up of two-by-four cedar strips. A frieze of screened openings runs the length of the building, allowing a cross-breeze and extra light in, while ceiling fans keep the air circulating in summer. “Animals, from deer to raccoons to all kinds of birds, come right up to the porch,” says Panton. Photo by: Greg Hursley

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Dillon residence interior hallway

Australian residence, John and Cathy Dillon drew from mid-century modern ethnic influences to design their dream home. Photo by: David Sandison

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Desert house exterior side

The Desert House located in Desert Hot Springs is a steel structure designed with large expansive windows, and concrete flooring.

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Engawa house interior kitchen and dinning room

This inviting Japanese home built from a palette of steel, wood and concrete is the product of architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka. Photo by: Adam Friedberg

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Opdahl house exterior walkway

The Opdahl House, designed by Edward Killingsworth for Richard and Joyce Opdahl, is located on the island of Naples, in Long Beach, California, and the design responds to the constraints imposed by the compact site. Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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Bunkhouse interior hallway

This Texan abode is made up of two-by-four cedar strips. A frieze of screened openings runs the length of the building, allowing a cross-breeze and extra light in, while ceiling fans keep the air circulating in summer. “Animals, from deer to raccoons to all kinds of birds, come right up to the porch,” says Panton. Photo by: Greg Hursley

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