Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum in Munich

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March 4, 2013
All it took was a new copper-clad addition, the installation of a geo-thermal heating and cooling system, and some LED lighting to transform an elegant yet out-of-date 19th century building in Munich. When architect Ulrich Hamann of the London-based architectural firm Foster + Partners undertook a four-year $79 million dollar renovation of the Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum in Munich, Germany, the results were both beautiful and smart. Read Full Article
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  The first thing visitors see when approaching the Lenbachhaus is the letter sculpture designed by Munich-born artist Thomas Demand. The artist, whose works have been shown at London's Tate Modern, the Guggenheim in New York, and the Stadel in Frankfurt has created a contrasting statement to the brass facade. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    The first thing visitors see when approaching the Lenbachhaus is the letter sculpture designed by Munich-born artist Thomas Demand. The artist, whose works have been shown at London's Tate Modern, the Guggenheim in New York, and the Stadel in Frankfurt has created a contrasting statement to the brass facade. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
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  Artichect Ulrich Hamann of the London-based firm Foster & Partners created a seamless addition to the 19th century Neo-Classical building that was home and studio of artist Franz von Lembach. For the Stadtische Galerie Im Lenbachhaus, as the new addtion is known, Hamann wrapped the exterior in brass. Making this eye-catching statement, he set if off from the palatial style of the museums that surround it. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    Artichect Ulrich Hamann of the London-based firm Foster & Partners created a seamless addition to the 19th century Neo-Classical building that was home and studio of artist Franz von Lembach. For the Stadtische Galerie Im Lenbachhaus, as the new addtion is known, Hamann wrapped the exterior in brass. Making this eye-catching statement, he set if off from the palatial style of the museums that surround it. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
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  Danish artist Olafur Eliasson designed the stunning spiral shaped work of art that is suspended from the ceiling in the new main entrance. Eliasson named it "Wirbelwerk" after the concept behind its spiral shape he based on the Coriolis effect. This deflects moving bodies in a rotating reference frame onto a spiral shaped trajectory. This force has been known since Gaspard-Gustave Coriolis wrote about it in an 1835 scientific paper. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    Danish artist Olafur Eliasson designed the stunning spiral shaped work of art that is suspended from the ceiling in the new main entrance. Eliasson named it "Wirbelwerk" after the concept behind its spiral shape he based on the Coriolis effect. This deflects moving bodies in a rotating reference frame onto a spiral shaped trajectory. This force has been known since Gaspard-Gustave Coriolis wrote about it in an 1835 scientific paper. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
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  Architect Ulrich Hamann's rendering of the new addition to the Lenbachhaus Museum and Gallery; the Stadtische Galerie Im Lenbachhaus. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    Architect Ulrich Hamann's rendering of the new addition to the Lenbachhaus Museum and Gallery; the Stadtische Galerie Im Lenbachhaus. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
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  Artist Franz von Lenbach built his studio in 1886, four years after he added his home. He commissioned German architect Gabriel von Seidl to design it in Neo-Classical Tuscan style. von Lenbach's intention was to build a monument to his art. He filled it with paintings and statuary from his many trips to Europe and furniture from Tuscany. When the villa was built, it was on the only road now called Luisenstrasse, that let up to the Nymphenburg Palace, (c. 1664) the summer home of the royal family of Bavaria. Because the royals would be passing it and going to and from their palace, the city of Munich set out rigorous rules for its design. In other words, the villa had to be stunning, giving the royals something nice to look at. And, it is. Today, 450,000 visitors each year enjoy von Lenbach's studio and home. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    Artist Franz von Lenbach built his studio in 1886, four years after he added his home. He commissioned German architect Gabriel von Seidl to design it in Neo-Classical Tuscan style. von Lenbach's intention was to build a monument to his art. He filled it with paintings and statuary from his many trips to Europe and furniture from Tuscany. When the villa was built, it was on the only road now called Luisenstrasse, that let up to the Nymphenburg Palace, (c. 1664) the summer home of the royal family of Bavaria. Because the royals would be passing it and going to and from their palace, the city of Munich set out rigorous rules for its design. In other words, the villa had to be stunning, giving the royals something nice to look at. And, it is. Today, 450,000 visitors each year enjoy von Lenbach's studio and home. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
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  Visitors to the Lenbachhaus Museum used to enter through the villa's front door. To the left is architect Ulrich Hamann's new entrance into the skylit atrium. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    Visitors to the Lenbachhaus Museum used to enter through the villa's front door. To the left is architect Ulrich Hamann's new entrance into the skylit atrium. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
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  When the villa was completed in 1890, its architect, Gabriel von Seidl designed the peaceful Italian Renaissance garden that surrounds it. The café in the Foster & Partners addition will overlook the restored gardens. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.
    When the villa was completed in 1890, its architect, Gabriel von Seidl designed the peaceful Italian Renaissance garden that surrounds it. The café in the Foster & Partners addition will overlook the restored gardens. Image courtesy of Lenbachhaus Gallery and Museum.

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