International Style

written by:
April 3, 2013
Our intrepid writers and editors have crossed oceans, traversed rugged terrain, and trekked around the globe in search of design-forward homes. The May 2013 Global Style issue hits newsstands April 16 (here's a first look at the cover, which features a house on the Greek isles) and to whet your appetite, here's a look at some of our favorite homes located in off-the-beaten-path international locales: Ghana, Indonesia, Israel, and El Salvador, among others.
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  Yang Yeo and his girlfriend Ching Ian relax on the back stoop of their renovated and radically updated Singapore shophouse—an archetypal building type in this busy port city. “Shophouses brought back memories of our childhood,” says Yeo.  Photo by: Richard Powers

    Yang Yeo and his girlfriend Ching Ian relax on the back stoop of their renovated and radically updated Singapore shophouse—an archetypal building type in this busy port city. “Shophouses brought back memories of our childhood,” says Yeo.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  A 20-foot glass wall, ample sunshine, and an enviable collection of furnishings help this well-appointed living room carry on in Haifa’s great modernist tradition.  Photo by: Amit Geron

    A 20-foot glass wall, ample sunshine, and an enviable collection of furnishings help this well-appointed living room carry on in Haifa’s great modernist tradition.

    Photo by: Amit Geron

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  “I wanted to explore ideas of light, cross ventilation, and lightness of structure,” Osae-Addo says of his one-story, 2,500-square-foot house in Accra, Ghana.

    “I wanted to explore ideas of light, cross ventilation, and lightness of structure,” Osae-Addo says of his one-story, 2,500-square-foot house in Accra, Ghana.

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  A 200-year-old factory in Umbria is transformed into an inviting home by designer Paola Navone. In the seating area, a trolley found at a flea market functions as the coffee table alongside an expansive Navone–designed sofa for Linteloo. Custom pendants by photographer Mark Eden Schooley hang above the dining table.  Photo by: Wichmann + Bendtsen

    A 200-year-old factory in Umbria is transformed into an inviting home by designer Paola Navone. In the seating area, a trolley found at a flea market functions as the coffee table alongside an expansive Navone–designed sofa for Linteloo. Custom pendants by photographer Mark Eden Schooley hang above the dining table.

    Photo by: Wichmann + Bendtsen

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  In Central America, Spanish colonial architecture prevails. But the creeping tide of modernism—represented here by the home of architect José Roberto Paredes—is signaling that change is afoot. The family room contains furniture reminiscent of Ligne Roset’s Togo collection and a CH 07 egg-carton lamp by Salvadoran designer Eugenio Menjívar.  Photo by: Paco Perez

    In Central America, Spanish colonial architecture prevails. But the creeping tide of modernism—represented here by the home of architect José Roberto Paredes—is signaling that change is afoot. The family room contains furniture reminiscent of Ligne Roset’s Togo collection and a CH 07 egg-carton lamp by Salvadoran designer Eugenio Menjívar.

    Photo by: Paco Perez

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  For photographer Reinaldo Cóser and his family of four, the best way to deal with the sometimes-draining throb of massive São Paulo was to create an inward-looking bastion of calm. The dining area is defined by a classic Oval dining table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. Brazilian master designer Sergio Rodrigues did the matching pair of armchairs in the living room.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    For photographer Reinaldo Cóser and his family of four, the best way to deal with the sometimes-draining throb of massive São Paulo was to create an inward-looking bastion of calm. The dining area is defined by a classic Oval dining table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. Brazilian master designer Sergio Rodrigues did the matching pair of armchairs in the living room.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.  Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

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  In snowy Sweden, where pine planks and the democratic design incubator Ikea reign supreme, a local architect pays homage to his patrimony, making a small, slatty home feel like a rather big deal.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    In snowy Sweden, where pine planks and the democratic design incubator Ikea reign supreme, a local architect pays homage to his patrimony, making a small, slatty home feel like a rather big deal.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  In most multistory homes, stairs connect floors. But in the 921-square-foot Coil house, located in a quiet residential neighborhood in Tokyo, they are the floors. Defined by 44 steps of varying depths and widths, Coil is a dynamic swirl of continuously ascending spaces, designed by local architect Akihisa Hirata for Sakura and Ryo Sugiura, a young couple with two children.  Photo by: Koichi Torimura

    In most multistory homes, stairs connect floors. But in the 921-square-foot Coil house, located in a quiet residential neighborhood in Tokyo, they are the floors. Defined by 44 steps of varying depths and widths, Coil is a dynamic swirl of continuously ascending spaces, designed by local architect Akihisa Hirata for Sakura and Ryo Sugiura, a young couple with two children.

    Photo by: Koichi Torimura

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