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I Spy an Installation

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The Dwell team sees scads of exhibits, pop-ups, and installations on our journeys both physical and digital, every week, from all over the globe. We're inspired by the power of such creative displays to surprise, create wonder, and sometimes simply amuse. Here are a few recent favorite installations. Look for more of our finds soon!
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  Artist William Lamson created the prismatic Solarium at the Storm King Art Center greenhouse out of 162 panels of sugar cooked to different temperatures. Lamson bakes the sugar until is caramelizes, closely monitoring the color. He then pours the syrup onto a pane of heated glass and as it cools he places another piece of glass on top. The glass "sandwich" is then sealed with silicone. The installation was part of the Light and Landscape exhibition at New York's Storm King Art Center that ran through November 11th, 2012.

    Artist William Lamson created the prismatic Solarium at the Storm King Art Center greenhouse out of 162 panels of sugar cooked to different temperatures. Lamson bakes the sugar until is caramelizes, closely monitoring the color. He then pours the syrup onto a pane of heated glass and as it cools he places another piece of glass on top. The glass "sandwich" is then sealed with silicone. The installation was part of the Light and Landscape exhibition at New York's Storm King Art Center that ran through November 11th, 2012.

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  Architects like Frank Gehry and Greg Lynn introduced the world to the dramatic forms made possible by digital fabrication—which involves the transfer of designs from a computer to machinery that creates building components—and Lisa Iwamoto and her husband, Craig Scott, were among its early pioneers. Here,  IwamotoScott was commissioned by the SCI-Arc Gallery of Southern California Institute of Architecture to do an installation for its prestigious architectural series that acts as an incubator for new ideas. (Los Angeles 2008.)

    Architects like Frank Gehry and Greg Lynn introduced the world to the dramatic forms made possible by digital fabrication—which involves the transfer of designs from a computer to machinery that creates building components—and Lisa Iwamoto and her husband, Craig Scott, were among its early pioneers. Here,  IwamotoScott was commissioned by the SCI-Arc Gallery of Southern California Institute of Architecture to do an installation for its prestigious architectural series that acts as an incubator for new ideas. (Los Angeles 2008.)

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  Jacob Hashimoto's work, "Silence Still Governs Our Consciousness," which debuted at the Macro Rome Contemporary Art Museum in 2010, is an installation made from more than 7,000 kites. Intended to encourage meditation and exploration of concepts of space and time, the work envelopes the viewer as if in a cloud.

    Jacob Hashimoto's work, "Silence Still Governs Our Consciousness," which debuted at the Macro Rome Contemporary Art Museum in 2010, is an installation made from more than 7,000 kites. Intended to encourage meditation and exploration of concepts of space and time, the work envelopes the viewer as if in a cloud.

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  Architect Akihisa Hirata let his imagination run away with itself in creating this geometric structure poised at the entry to the Museum of Contemporary Art of Tokyo. Isosceles trianges seem to grow out of themselves, clambering towards the sky. Via knstrct.

    Architect Akihisa Hirata let his imagination run away with itself in creating this geometric structure poised at the entry to the Museum of Contemporary Art of Tokyo. Isosceles trianges seem to grow out of themselves, clambering towards the sky. Via knstrct.

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  Architect firm Moorhead and Moorhead designed the Mobile Chaplet as one of six portable “spaces for reflection” commissioned by the Roberts Street Chaplet Project to travel to rural communities in North Dakota.

    Architect firm Moorhead and Moorhead designed the Mobile Chaplet as one of six portable “spaces for reflection” commissioned by the Roberts Street Chaplet Project to travel to rural communities in North Dakota.

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  Lego bombing. Admittedly, it's more guerrilla art than installation, but we love the creativity just the same. Here, a crumbling corner is the perfect surface for a bit of Lego fortification.

    Lego bombing. Admittedly, it's more guerrilla art than installation, but we love the creativity just the same. Here, a crumbling corner is the perfect surface for a bit of Lego fortification.

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