Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Humble Beauty: 4 Creative Uses of Plywood

Read Article
As these residences prove, you don't need pricey, high-end materials to craft a high-design home. In the right hands, even humble sheets of plywood take on a luxurious new dimension. Click through the slideshow to see more examples of creative, modern uses of plywood.
  • 
  The exterior of the Popadich residence on Auckland’s North Shore is modeled after boat storage sheds, while the interior is outfitted with industrial concrete and ply. "We decided to line the interior in exposed plywood sheets [to save money]," says Davor Popadich, a director at Pattersons Architects in Auckland, New Zealand. "On paper, plasterboard seemed cheaper, but then we realized it would cost money to plaster and paint it, which pushed the overall cost up. And the builders liked that, because they got to show off their workmanship, which is usually covered up by plaster and paint." Photo by Simon Devitt.  Photo by: Simon DevittCourtesy of: © 2011 Simon Devitt

    The exterior of the Popadich residence on Auckland’s North Shore is modeled after boat storage sheds, while the interior is outfitted with industrial concrete and ply. "We decided to line the interior in exposed plywood sheets [to save money]," says Davor Popadich, a director at Pattersons Architects in Auckland, New Zealand. "On paper, plasterboard seemed cheaper, but then we realized it would cost money to plaster and paint it, which pushed the overall cost up. And the builders liked that, because they got to show off their workmanship, which is usually covered up by plaster and paint." Photo by Simon Devitt.

    Photo by: Simon Devitt

    Courtesy of: © 2011 Simon Devitt

  • 
  Plywood is used throughout the interior of this small, barn-inspired house in an apple orchard in Havelock North, New Zealand. There's Gaboon plywood below the datum and Italian poplar above it, used on everything from the walls and ceiling to the bench and cabinets in the kitchen to the wardrobes and shelving. The mezzanine bedroom sits beneath the off-center apex of the pyramid roof, with a view over the orchard. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.  Photo by: Patrick Reynolds

    Plywood is used throughout the interior of this small, barn-inspired house in an apple orchard in Havelock North, New Zealand. There's Gaboon plywood below the datum and Italian poplar above it, used on everything from the walls and ceiling to the bench and cabinets in the kitchen to the wardrobes and shelving. The mezzanine bedroom sits beneath the off-center apex of the pyramid roof, with a view over the orchard. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.

    Photo by: Patrick Reynolds

  • 
  Plywood walls, a red-cedar-shingled door, and wooden furniture make up the kitchen/dining room in this off-the-grid A-frame retreat in Auvilliers, France. Photo by Céline Clanet.  Photo by: Céline Clanet

    Plywood walls, a red-cedar-shingled door, and wooden furniture make up the kitchen/dining room in this off-the-grid A-frame retreat in Auvilliers, France. Photo by Céline Clanet.

    Photo by: Céline Clanet

  • 
  In 1956 in Tuxedo Park, New York, architect Carl Koch, a prefab pioneer, erected one of his earliest “Techbuilt Houses,” a 2,400-square-foot four-bedroom home constructed largely from standardized four-by-eight-foot modules attached to a post-and-beam frame. Architects Gilles Depardon and Kathryn Ogawa recently completed the house’s renovation. On the second floor, the architects maintained the existing exposed post-and-beam structure but exchanged the original furniture-grade Luan mahogany ceiling for a stained birch plywood. Photo by Carl Bellavia.  Photo by: Carl Bellavia

    In 1956 in Tuxedo Park, New York, architect Carl Koch, a prefab pioneer, erected one of his earliest “Techbuilt Houses,” a 2,400-square-foot four-bedroom home constructed largely from standardized four-by-eight-foot modules attached to a post-and-beam frame. Architects Gilles Depardon and Kathryn Ogawa recently completed the house’s renovation. On the second floor, the architects maintained the existing exposed post-and-beam structure but exchanged the original furniture-grade Luan mahogany ceiling for a stained birch plywood. Photo by Carl Bellavia.

    Photo by: Carl Bellavia

@current / @total

Categories:

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising