How to Design with Green

written by:
February 13, 2013
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  When constructing a weekend house for a young family in Healdsburg, California, architect Michael Cobb opted for natural building materials, including a green-tinted conversion varnish for the kitchen cabinets that pops against the surrounding wood.  Photo by Drew Kelly. Courtesy of Drew Kelly .

    When constructing a weekend house for a young family in Healdsburg, California, architect Michael Cobb opted for natural building materials, including a green-tinted conversion varnish for the kitchen cabinets that pops against the surrounding wood.

    Photo by Drew Kelly. Courtesy of Drew Kelly .
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  The reddish tinge from an assortment of copper pots and pans brings out the green undertones in ICI Dulux Paint's Pale Water hue. The wall lends a rustic yet modern feeling to the kitchen of this Dallas home.  Photo by Caren Alpert.

    The reddish tinge from an assortment of copper pots and pans brings out the green undertones in ICI Dulux Paint's Pale Water hue. The wall lends a rustic yet modern feeling to the kitchen of this Dallas home.

    Photo by Caren Alpert.
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  The most ecological way to incorporate green into your home is with vegetation. The courtyard of a Corbusier-inspired home in Paris features a bright shock of foliage in the form of a 20-foot-tall vertical garden. Meanwhile, crops of green grass sprout haphazardly among the hexagonal pavers below.  Photo by Filippo Bamberghi.

    The most ecological way to incorporate green into your home is with vegetation. The courtyard of a Corbusier-inspired home in Paris features a bright shock of foliage in the form of a 20-foot-tall vertical garden. Meanwhile, crops of green grass sprout haphazardly among the hexagonal pavers below.

    Photo by Filippo Bamberghi.
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  After walking through the front door of the Moinian and Melli residence in Switzerland, visitors enter directly into the enormous kitchen and living space. The interior is minimal, using predominantly timber and concrete. The yellow-green Transform sofa is by Moroso and the forest-green Pastil chair is by Eero Aarnio.  Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.   This originally appeared in Swiss Mix.

    After walking through the front door of the Moinian and Melli residence in Switzerland, visitors enter directly into the enormous kitchen and living space. The interior is minimal, using predominantly timber and concrete. The yellow-green Transform sofa is by Moroso and the forest-green Pastil chair is by Eero Aarnio.

    Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
    This originally appeared in Swiss Mix.
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  The bedroom of a modern house in Sicily is open and playful with only a bit of red Algue by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec guarding the stairs. The world map decal on the wall is from My Vinilo. Emerald pillowcases soften up the scheme.  Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.   This originally appeared in Less Is Amore.

    The bedroom of a modern house in Sicily is open and playful with only a bit of red Algue by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec guarding the stairs. The world map decal on the wall is from My Vinilo. Emerald pillowcases soften up the scheme.

    Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.
    This originally appeared in Less Is Amore.
  • 
  Yuko Shibata wanted more shelf space in her home office in Tokyo, so she added a plywood door with built-in bookshelves that opens into her bedroom to form a reading nook. Glimpsed from the adjacent room, the space looks larger than it actually is, thanks to the bright green walls.  Photo by Ryohei Hamada.   This originally appeared in Simple Division.

    Yuko Shibata wanted more shelf space in her home office in Tokyo, so she added a plywood door with built-in bookshelves that opens into her bedroom to form a reading nook. Glimpsed from the adjacent room, the space looks larger than it actually is, thanks to the bright green walls.

    Photo by Ryohei Hamada.
    This originally appeared in Simple Division.
  • 
  Architect Whitney Sander and product developer Eric Chu used bus graphics to provide an attractive privacy screen for a Los Angeles prefab house. Chu ran a couple of photos he had taken of a tree through some Photoshop filters for what he calls “a painterly effect,” sent them to Astek Inc., and, about $5,000 later, he had a pair of roughly 500-square-foot vinyl panels.

    Architect Whitney Sander and product developer Eric Chu used bus graphics to provide an attractive privacy screen for a Los Angeles prefab house. Chu ran a couple of photos he had taken of a tree through some Photoshop filters for what he calls “a painterly effect,” sent them to Astek Inc., and, about $5,000 later, he had a pair of roughly 500-square-foot vinyl panels.

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  Apple green was the color of choice for the kitchen in this Melbourne, Australia, house.  Photo by Prue Ruscoe.   This originally appeared in Bellemo & Cat's Cradle.

    Apple green was the color of choice for the kitchen in this Melbourne, Australia, house.

    Photo by Prue Ruscoe.
    This originally appeared in Bellemo & Cat's Cradle.
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  Tuned into its sylvan setting, this affordable green home in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is a modern take on the surrounding centuries-old structures. The bright green paint on its facade contrasts with the Cor-Ten steel cladding.  Photo by Richard Leo Johnson, Atlantic Archives.   This originally appeared in Region of Honor.

    Tuned into its sylvan setting, this affordable green home in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is a modern take on the surrounding centuries-old structures. The bright green paint on its facade contrasts with the Cor-Ten steel cladding.

    Photo by Richard Leo Johnson, Atlantic Archives.
    This originally appeared in Region of Honor.
  • 
  In the warm interior of the X House in Hennepin, Illinois, Diane Pascal and Thomas Richie enjoy the view from their boiled-wool Ligne Roset couch in the main living area, where wood paneling on the ceiling and walls mirrors the topography of the landscape. A gauzy green curtain adds a moment of color to the scheme.  Courtesy of Justin Reid.

    In the warm interior of the X House in Hennepin, Illinois, Diane Pascal and Thomas Richie enjoy the view from their boiled-wool Ligne Roset couch in the main living area, where wood paneling on the ceiling and walls mirrors the topography of the landscape. A gauzy green curtain adds a moment of color to the scheme.

    Courtesy of Justin Reid.
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  Green countertops outfit the kitchen of the Ewing residence.  Photo by Kyoko Hamada.   This originally appeared in Bringing It All Back Home.

    Green countertops outfit the kitchen of the Ewing residence.

    Photo by Kyoko Hamada.
    This originally appeared in Bringing It All Back Home.
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  A late-1950s set of sofa and chairs inherited from resident Kieran Gaffney’s granny warm up the living room, as do the stove from Charnwood and the coffee table he bought from Habitat for his first flat. Read the full story about the modern Scottish house here.  Photo by Ben Anders.   This originally appeared in A Piece of Home.

    A late-1950s set of sofa and chairs inherited from resident Kieran Gaffney’s granny warm up the living room, as do the stove from Charnwood and the coffee table he bought from Habitat for his first flat. Read the full story about the modern Scottish house here.

    Photo by Ben Anders.
    This originally appeared in A Piece of Home.
  • 
  Modern green cabinets provide a lively focal point in this kitchen.  Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.  This originally appeared in A Place to Stand.

    Modern green cabinets provide a lively focal point in this kitchen.

    Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.
    This originally appeared in A Place to Stand.
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