Hand-Powered Lamp

written by:
May 8, 2009

Producing power by harnessing kinetic energy from human and animal movement is a great idea but one with few good results. Disco-ball lights powered by club-goers getting down on the dance floor is a fun concept but ultimately unsustainable—one can only do the Electric Slide for so long—and there are simply not enough hamsters in the world for those rodent-wheel-energy fantasies to be fulfilled. Recently, Swedish designer Karin Johansson approached the concept with a slightly new angle, generating light through a familiar activity: Spinning a globe.

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  The Dynamic Lamp (stationary) by Karin Johansson"My Dynamic Lamp is a part of the wireless society," Johansson writes about her design. "It doesn't need any power supply or batteries; it just works with your own energy. It is based on the idea of producing your energy where you are, instead of transporting it in all directions across the earth. The sole by-product is exercise."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    The Dynamic Lamp (stationary) by Karin Johansson"My Dynamic Lamp is a part of the wireless society," Johansson writes about her design. "It doesn't need any power supply or batteries; it just works with your own energy. It is based on the idea of producing your energy where you are, instead of transporting it in all directions across the earth. The sole by-product is exercise."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  The Dynamic Lamp (in use) by Karin Johansson"My Dynamic Lamp is a part of the wireless society," Johansson writes about her design. "It doesn't need any power supply or batteries; it just works with your own energy. It is based on the idea of producing your energy where you are, instead of transporting it in all directions across the earth. The sole by-product is exercise."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    The Dynamic Lamp (in use) by Karin Johansson"My Dynamic Lamp is a part of the wireless society," Johansson writes about her design. "It doesn't need any power supply or batteries; it just works with your own energy. It is based on the idea of producing your energy where you are, instead of transporting it in all directions across the earth. The sole by-product is exercise."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  Pyriform glasses and decanter by Andreas DahlbergAndreas Dahlberg based the design of his Pyriform glasses and decanter on the shape of birds' nests made by cliff-dwelling birds who lay their eggs on narrow ledges, which are often conical rather than circular or spherical, Dahlberg writes about his design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    Pyriform glasses and decanter by Andreas DahlbergAndreas Dahlberg based the design of his Pyriform glasses and decanter on the shape of birds' nests made by cliff-dwelling birds who lay their eggs on narrow ledges, which are often conical rather than circular or spherical, Dahlberg writes about his design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  Lux necklace by Mae YokoyamaMae Yokoyama's necklace combines haute couture and high technology to highlight the benefits of solar energy. During the day, the solar panels create a bold collar necklace. At night, the energy accumulated during the daytime illuminates small lights to create the effect of a string of pearls, Yokoyama writes about her design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    Lux necklace by Mae YokoyamaMae Yokoyama's necklace combines haute couture and high technology to highlight the benefits of solar energy. During the day, the solar panels create a bold collar necklace. At night, the energy accumulated during the daytime illuminates small lights to create the effect of a string of pearls, Yokoyama writes about her design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  Lux necklace by Mae YokoyamaMae Yokoyama's necklace combines haute couture and high technology to highlight the benefits of solar energy. During the day, the solar panels create a bold collar necklace. At night, the energy accumulated during the daytime illuminates small lights to create the effect of a string of pearls, Yokoyama writes about her design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    Lux necklace by Mae YokoyamaMae Yokoyama's necklace combines haute couture and high technology to highlight the benefits of solar energy. During the day, the solar panels create a bold collar necklace. At night, the energy accumulated during the daytime illuminates small lights to create the effect of a string of pearls, Yokoyama writes about her design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  Look Around-Loosen Up vase by Stine MærkliMærkli's vase is an example of her work investigating body language, gestures, and movement in glass design. The Look Around-Loosen Up vase consists of stiff and mobile sections that reflect "a direct transfer of body movements to functional objects," she writes about her design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    Look Around-Loosen Up vase by Stine MærkliMærkli's vase is an example of her work investigating body language, gestures, and movement in glass design. The Look Around-Loosen Up vase consists of stiff and mobile sections that reflect "a direct transfer of body movements to functional objects," she writes about her design.Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  Expandable Living chair by Knud Brandt and Jens Gustavsson"Stockholm is said to be the city with the highest percentage of single person households in the world—many of them are students. As a student, you often have a great circle of friends but less square meters to invite them to," Gustavsson writes about his design. "This is a one-man chair for a one-man household that can expand to be a bench for ten friends."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    Expandable Living chair by Knud Brandt and Jens Gustavsson"Stockholm is said to be the city with the highest percentage of single person households in the world—many of them are students. As a student, you often have a great circle of friends but less square meters to invite them to," Gustavsson writes about his design. "This is a one-man chair for a one-man household that can expand to be a bench for ten friends."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
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  Expandable Living bench by Knud Brandt and Jens Gustavsson"Stockholm is said to be the city with the highest percentage of single person households in the world—many of them are students. As a student, you often have a great circle of friends but less square meters to invite them to," Gustavsson writes about his design. "This is a one-man chair for a one-man household that can expand to be a bench for ten friends."Photo by Andreas Nyquist
    Expandable Living bench by Knud Brandt and Jens Gustavsson"Stockholm is said to be the city with the highest percentage of single person households in the world—many of them are students. As a student, you often have a great circle of friends but less square meters to invite them to," Gustavsson writes about his design. "This is a one-man chair for a one-man household that can expand to be a bench for ten friends."Photo by Andreas Nyquist

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