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Gimme Shelter

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Earlier this month, the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education opened their Gimme Shelter exhibition, featuring six temporary woodland shelters that offer places of rest and respite to the visitors of the 350-acre nature preserve just outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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  Firefly by Rashida Ng and Nami YamamotoThis bedlike bench invites visitors to relax and enjoy the sky above.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Firefly by Rashida Ng and Nami YamamotoThis bedlike bench invites visitors to relax and enjoy the sky above.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Woodland Canopy by FORM Design CollaborativeThis basket-woven teepeelike structure of bamboo and hemp rope is partially covered by a waterproofed hemp canvas and constructed of locally obtained, FSC-certified or reclaimed lumber.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Woodland Canopy by FORM Design CollaborativeThis basket-woven teepeelike structure of bamboo and hemp rope is partially covered by a waterproofed hemp canvas and constructed of locally obtained, FSC-certified or reclaimed lumber.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Rain Sail by Team Strada, Alexa Rosse and Ari MillerConstructed of recycled billboard material, this structure features hammocks under saillike wings of fabric that collect rain to power generators and light the structure at night.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Rain Sail by Team Strada, Alexa Rosse and Ari MillerConstructed of recycled billboard material, this structure features hammocks under saillike wings of fabric that collect rain to power generators and light the structure at night.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Bird-Seed Shelter by Julia Molloy and Taka SaruiThe earthen structure is made from a mixture of mud, seeds, nuts, and water from which native grasses and flowers will grow and to which birds will visit for food and shelter.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Bird-Seed Shelter by Julia Molloy and Taka SaruiThe earthen structure is made from a mixture of mud, seeds, nuts, and water from which native grasses and flowers will grow and to which birds will visit for food and shelter.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Bird-Seed Shelter by Julia Molloy and Taka SaruiThe hemp-lined interiors provide temporary sleeping quarters. As the seasons pass, the structure will decompose and break down into a pile of earth.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Bird-Seed Shelter by Julia Molloy and Taka SaruiThe hemp-lined interiors provide temporary sleeping quarters. As the seasons pass, the structure will decompose and break down into a pile of earth.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Rain Shelter by GCArchitects, Gabriela Sanz Rodriguez and Carlos Martinez MedieroConstructed from recycled wood, the rain shelter provides as much solice as entertainment: It becomes a fountain in the rain, a prism of light in the sun, and a whistle in the wind.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Rain Shelter by GCArchitects, Gabriela Sanz Rodriguez and Carlos Martinez MedieroConstructed from recycled wood, the rain shelter provides as much solice as entertainment: It becomes a fountain in the rain, a prism of light in the sun, and a whistle in the wind.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Bambooze! by Rebecca Popowsky and Riggs SkepnekThe walls of the Bambooze! are made from bales of locally produced straw that are secured with bamboo stakes. The stakes protrude out of the top of the walls to support the roof, also made from bamboo. The roof slopes forward to guide rainwater to the garden in front of the structure.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Bambooze! by Rebecca Popowsky and Riggs SkepnekThe walls of the Bambooze! are made from bales of locally produced straw that are secured with bamboo stakes. The stakes protrude out of the top of the walls to support the roof, also made from bamboo. The roof slopes forward to guide rainwater to the garden in front of the structure.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
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  Bambooze! by Rebecca Popowsky and Riggs SkepnekA series of circular openings made from short bamboo shoots and recycled glass bottles give the wall color and texture.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of  the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
    Bambooze! by Rebecca Popowsky and Riggs SkepnekA series of circular openings made from short bamboo shoots and recycled glass bottles give the wall color and texture.Photo by Jack Ramsdale. Courtesy of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.

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