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March 4, 2013
Austin, Texas: Home to food trucks, live music, the first Whole Foods, and annual stomping grounds for the tech set, Austin also happens to have a kicking modern architecture scene. Take a look at some of the homes we've featured in the endearingly weird capital of Texas.

An architectural designer and an artist harnessed the collective power of their design firm to renovate a dilapidated mid-century gem into a hillside perch for their family.Dieter Rams’s modular 620 Chair Programme, from the 1960s, takes center stage in the Alford-Young family’s living room. The set is accompanied by Artemide’s classic Tolomeo floor lamp and a Portofino Bergère chair that was designed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti. The rolling glass doors running the length of the room are from Fleetwood.

Photo by: Brent Humphreys 

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Newly minted college graduate Blake Dollahite saw an opportunity in this transitional time to build a foundation for his future. With a small bank loan and a lot of helping hands, Dollahite dove into his first year of freedom by shackling himself to a rundown Austin bungalow and preparing to make it home.The bedroom, shown here, takes up the small second floor of the house.

Photo by: Misty Keasler 

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In Austin, mid-century homes built in the wake of World War II join more traditional vernacular architecture. Mid-century houses are a “small but appreciated minority” in Austin—one can head into Hill Country to spot the strictly vernacular dogtrot-style homes.

Photo by: Brent Humphreys 

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The last time Blake Trabulsi and Allison Orr had a party at their modern house in Austin, Texas, it lasted until 5 a.m. Observes Trabulsi: “People are so comfortable here, they never want to leave.”

Photo by: Jack Thompson

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Austin couple Anne Suttles and Sam Shah built a house to last their lifetime—and longer. Mixing new efficient systems with old upcycled materials in their home, they keep it weird while keeping it green.

Here, Anne waters the bamboo muhly, palo verde, strawberry tree, and magic carpet thyme thriving in their yard.

Photo by: Brent Humphreys

 

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heartofgoldandpineaustinhome

An architectural designer and an artist harnessed the collective power of their design firm to renovate a dilapidated mid-century gem into a hillside perch for their family.Dieter Rams’s modular 620 Chair Programme, from the 1960s, takes center stage in the Alford-Young family’s living room. The set is accompanied by Artemide’s classic Tolomeo floor lamp and a Portofino Bergère chair that was designed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti. The rolling glass doors running the length of the room are from Fleetwood.

Photo by: Brent Humphreys 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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