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The Dogs of Dwell

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Is the modernist's perfect companion a fluffy pooch? For the residents of these 15 homes—spanning a renovated farmhouse in the Italian countryside to a Chicago loft filled with epicurean delights—the answer is a resounding "yes." Just for fun, we've rounded up our favorite four-legged friends gracing the pages of Dwell. 

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  "The only way we can live in 400 square feet is because we thought out each detail and tried to make every space usable when we were designing the renovation," says Tolya and Stonorov who resides in this former barn with her husband, Otto, and son, Niko. Those details include a custom dog door for their Blue Heeler, Oscar. See more of the renovated small-space home.  Photo by: Aya Brackett

    "The only way we can live in 400 square feet is because we thought out each detail and tried to make every space usable when we were designing the renovation," says Tolya and Stonorov who resides in this former barn with her husband, Otto, and son, Niko. Those details include a custom dog door for their Blue Heeler, Oscar. See more of the renovated small-space home.

    Photo by: Aya Brackett

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  This photo from our February 2009 story "Take Me Home" includes three amazing things: a shaggy pup, tie-dye, and a George Nelson wall clock. See more of this 1,900-square-foot prefab cabin nestled in the sylvan foothills of West Virginia.  Photo by: Chris Mueller

    This photo from our February 2009 story "Take Me Home" includes three amazing things: a shaggy pup, tie-dye, and a George Nelson wall clock. See more of this 1,900-square-foot prefab cabin nestled in the sylvan foothills of West Virginia.

    Photo by: Chris Mueller

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  We recently featured this Atlanta, Georgia, renovation by architectural designer Barbara Hill. Here, one of the residents' rescued greyhounds prowls through the foyer. Don't miss all nine photos of the house.  Photo by: Gregory Miller

    We recently featured this Atlanta, Georgia, renovation by architectural designer Barbara Hill. Here, one of the residents' rescued greyhounds prowls through the foyer. Don't miss all nine photos of the house.

    Photo by: Gregory Miller

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  Standout elements of the Monfumo, Italy, abode of Guido and Sabrina Chiavelli include slate floors and a glass-roofed kitchen. Check out the entire renovation.  Photo by: Helenio Barbetta

    Standout elements of the Monfumo, Italy, abode of Guido and Sabrina Chiavelli include slate floors and a glass-roofed kitchen. Check out the entire renovation.

    Photo by: Helenio Barbetta

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  Bernese mountain dogs Vinnie and Stella have the run of Bill and Abbie Burton's Marmol Radziner–designed prefab retreat in Ukiah, California.  Photo by: Dwight Eschliman

    Bernese mountain dogs Vinnie and Stella have the run of Bill and Abbie Burton's Marmol Radziner–designed prefab retreat in Ukiah, California.

    Photo by: Dwight Eschliman

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  Paul and Shoko Shozi's dog, Mei. See more of their Marina del Rey prefab home.  Photo by: Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao

    Paul and Shoko Shozi's dog, Mei. See more of their Marina del Rey prefab home.

    Photo by: Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao

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  Though the front of this 1880s home in Adelaide, Australia, maintains a traditional facade due to strict heritage laws, the rear is modern eye candy at its best. See more of the home.  Photo by: James KnowlerCourtesy of: James Knowler Photography

    Though the front of this 1880s home in Adelaide, Australia, maintains a traditional facade due to strict heritage laws, the rear is modern eye candy at its best. See more of the home.

    Photo by: James Knowler

    Courtesy of: James Knowler Photography

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  Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene flipped a 1957 Arthur Witthoefft design that lost its luster through the years (it's hard to believe the before and after photos are of the same house). The two stocked the interiors with mid-century classics...and a French bulldog. Read the story here.  Photo by: Jason Schmidt

    Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene flipped a 1957 Arthur Witthoefft design that lost its luster through the years (it's hard to believe the before and after photos are of the same house). The two stocked the interiors with mid-century classics...and a French bulldog. Read the story here.

    Photo by: Jason Schmidt

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  Pork Chop, the dog belonging to the gastronomes living in this Chicago loft, has plenty of comfortable places to nap between meals.  Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Pork Chop, the dog belonging to the gastronomes living in this Chicago loft, has plenty of comfortable places to nap between meals.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

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  Utah’s first LEED for Homes–rated house provides shelter for a family of five and their chocolate lab, Oso.  Photo by: Dustin Aksland

    Utah’s first LEED for Homes–rated house provides shelter for a family of five and their chocolate lab, Oso.

    Photo by: Dustin Aksland

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  Auburn 7 developer and resident Michael Kyle hangs with his dog, Moxy. Read the full story.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Auburn 7 developer and resident Michael Kyle hangs with his dog, Moxy. Read the full story.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  Another dog spotted! This time in the residence of designer Nick Dine.  Photo by: Jeremy Liebman

    Another dog spotted! This time in the residence of designer Nick Dine.

    Photo by: Jeremy Liebman

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  "There are some unconventional aspects to the house, but we’re also using it as an architecture studio, and a pavilion, and a warehouse. If we’re interested in something, we can bring it in and experiment with it. When we were working on an art installation, we had two 300-pound blocks of ice in a tub in the middle of the room. At one point there were 800 yards of fabric piled up. We have a dog, and when we had all that fabric lying around, he loved it, he was like “Oh my god, it’s furniture.” And then it was gone."—Jay Atherton, resident of this Phoenix, Arizona, house.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

    "There are some unconventional aspects to the house, but we’re also using it as an architecture studio, and a pavilion, and a warehouse. If we’re interested in something, we can bring it in and experiment with it. When we were working on an art installation, we had two 300-pound blocks of ice in a tub in the middle of the room. At one point there were 800 yards of fabric piled up. We have a dog, and when we had all that fabric lying around, he loved it, he was like “Oh my god, it’s furniture.” And then it was gone."—Jay Atherton, resident of this Phoenix, Arizona, house.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

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  Stefan Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor. Look closely and you'll see his pup watching from the lower deck. View the entire slideshow.  Photo by: Richard PowersCourtesy of: Richard Powers

    Stefan Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor. Look closely and you'll see his pup watching from the lower deck. View the entire slideshow.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

    Courtesy of: Richard Powers

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  One final friend to end the slideshow. See inside the Sebastopol house here.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    One final friend to end the slideshow. See inside the Sebastopol house here.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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