written by:
April 22, 2013
Atlanta is known for many things but modern architecture has surely never been one of them. But if you know where to look, you can find the city's modern side. Ahead of Dwell's April 24 "Innovations in Kitchen Design" event at the Sub-Zero and Wolf Atlanta showroom, we take a look at the city's design scene.

Music-industry executive, amateur furniture designer, and former architecture student Shawn Moseley worked closely with designer Scott Ball to design and build his new house in central Atlanta. “What would a house look like,” Ball says he hoped to discover, “if we eliminated wall cavities, Sheetrock ceilings, interior bearing walls, and other items that typically create problems as a house grows old and the use patterns change?” The overarching goal was a design that worked better and was more grounded in Atlanta’s particular set of needs than a “traditionally” built home. See more of the modern Moseley Residence on Dwell.com. Photo by Mark Steinmetz.

1 / 5

Herman Miller’s National Design Center in Atlanta achieved a LEED Gold rating for commercial interiors. Designed by Krueck+Sexton Architects, the space is one of the most sustainable of Herman Miller’s facilities, all of which are intended to meet or surpass the criteria for LEED Silver. The green elements of the 15,000-square-foot showroom are the same features that make it a pleasant place to work: sunlight through clerestory and full-height windows, high rafters made of natural wood, and glass walls that emphasize transparency in the workplace.

2 / 5

Designer Barbara Hill applies her polished take on minimalism to this traditional 1920s abode in Atlanta for a transplanted Houston family. Hill had the overhead lighting in the kitchen customized by Rich Brilliant Willing in a pert orange that accents the primarily black-and-white interior scheme. She added a stainless steel kitchen island by Bulthaup, its glossiness and “clean feel” tempered by the plastic stacking stools designed by Konstantin Grcic for Magis. The cabinets, appliances, countertops, and marble tile were kept as-is, with the addition of several coats of white paint in order to blend seamlessly with the walls. Photo by Gregory Miller. See the rest of this surprisingly modern Atlanta house on Dwell.com.

3 / 5

Name the hubs for emerging American designers and you'll likely hear the usual suspects of Seattle, San Francisco, and Brooklyn. Look southward, too, though, for a crop of energetic young guns set on making their mark. One such designer, Atlanta-based Chris Hardy, enticed the iconic Italian lighting manufacturer FontanaArte to produce his new Wig lamp. Wig was designed for the iconic Italian brand FontanaArte and debuted at Euroluce 2011. Forty molded aluminum petals create the lamp's shade. Read our interview with the young designer.

4 / 5

For more insights into modern Atlanta, and modern kitchen design, join us at the Sub-Zero and Wolf Atlanta showroom on April 24th from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Dwell Deputy Editor Jaime Gillin will join the luxury appliance leader with panelists Doug Henderson, Co-Owner of Switch Modern, and Alison Weidner, Architectural Sales Manager at Poggenpohl Atlanta, for a special discussion about the latest high-end appliances, the newest trends in traditional and contemporary design, and what the future holds for your kitchen.

5 / 5
atlanta moseley residence exterior portrait

Music-industry executive, amateur furniture designer, and former architecture student Shawn Moseley worked closely with designer Scott Ball to design and build his new house in central Atlanta. “What would a house look like,” Ball says he hoped to discover, “if we eliminated wall cavities, Sheetrock ceilings, interior bearing walls, and other items that typically create problems as a house grows old and the use patterns change?” The overarching goal was a design that worked better and was more grounded in Atlanta’s particular set of needs than a “traditionally” built home. See more of the modern Moseley Residence on Dwell.com. Photo by Mark Steinmetz.

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...