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Best Western: Our Favorite Modern Homes in Texas

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In our latest regional round-up—hope you caught our posts on New England and Belgium—we turn our attentions to Texas, an outsize state with a notorious maverick streak. From an affordable clutch of row houses in Houston to a cool-kid ranch with mid-century bones, this quintet of homes proves that when it comes to modern design, you might wanna mess with Texas.
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  For a cost-conscious 2,000-square-foot renovation located 30 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, architect Nick Deaver took a look around for inspiration. He spied galvanized metal cladding on the region’s sheds and co-opted the inexpensive, resilient material for his own design.

    For a cost-conscious 2,000-square-foot renovation located 30 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, architect Nick Deaver took a look around for inspiration. He spied galvanized metal cladding on the region’s sheds and co-opted the inexpensive, resilient material for his own design.

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  By taking advantage of economies of scale, a Houston native and Shade House Development teamed up to create nine affordable row houses in the Houston Heights.  Photo by: Jack Thompson
    By taking advantage of economies of scale, a Houston native and Shade House Development teamed up to create nine affordable row houses in the Houston Heights.

    Photo by: Jack Thompson

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  Native Texans and married designers Elizabeth Alford and Michael Young came home to roost ten years ago, when they ditched big-city life in New York for a modern ranch house in Austin. The home, originally built by architect Jonathan Bowman in 1957, sits in a landscape of limestone cliffs in the Balcones fault zone, the geographical boundary between the prairie lands that extend all the way to the Gulf of Mexico and the rolling, agriculture-rich Hill Country.  Photo by: Brent Humphreys

    Native Texans and married designers Elizabeth Alford and Michael Young came home to roost ten years ago, when they ditched big-city life in New York for a modern ranch house in Austin. The home, originally built by architect Jonathan Bowman in 1957, sits in a landscape of limestone cliffs in the Balcones fault zone, the geographical boundary between the prairie lands that extend all the way to the Gulf of Mexico and the rolling, agriculture-rich Hill Country.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  Andy and Regina Rihn lean on their other blue-clad affordable design, a 1958 AMC Rambler Super station wagon, in front of their house in Austin, Texas.   Photo by: Misty Keasler

    Andy and Regina Rihn lean on their other blue-clad affordable design, a 1958 AMC Rambler Super station wagon, in front of their house in Austin, Texas.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

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  Outside their homes on Throckmorton Street in Dallas, architect Edward Baum (right) and his neighbor admire the fruits of Baum’s labors. Photo by: Scogin Mayo  Photo by: Scogin Mayo
    Outside their homes on Throckmorton Street in Dallas, architect Edward Baum (right) and his neighbor admire the fruits of Baum’s labors. Photo by: Scogin Mayo

    Photo by: Scogin Mayo

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