Best Norwegian Design

written by:
April 22, 2013
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  At first glance the Boxhome by Sami Rintala does indeed look like a small box, its walls a shiny gray metal crisscrossed with insulating glass. Scarcely wider than the length of a person, it is striking and oddly beautiful. Photo by: Pia Ulin.

    At first glance the Boxhome by Sami Rintala does indeed look like a small box, its walls a shiny gray metal crisscrossed with insulating glass. Scarcely wider than the length of a person, it is striking and oddly beautiful. Photo by: Pia Ulin.

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  Marianne Lien and Lasse Altern Halvorsen opened Pur Norsk in Oslo in 2006 to seek out and promote the finest in Norweigan design.

    Marianne Lien and Lasse Altern Halvorsen opened Pur Norsk in Oslo in 2006 to seek out and promote the finest in Norweigan design.

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  In the story Fjord Focus we profile the work of Norwegian architects Jarmund/Vigsnaes. At nearly 80,000 square feet, the Oslo International School is one of Jarmund/Vigsnæs’s larger projects. Situated just outside Oslo, the school was recently renovated, with some 40,000 square feet of new construction. The colored panels suggest a sunny optimism, something the architects hoped to imbue in an educational context. Photo by: Ivan Brodey.

    In the story Fjord Focus we profile the work of Norwegian architects Jarmund/Vigsnaes. At nearly 80,000 square feet, the Oslo International School is one of Jarmund/Vigsnæs’s larger projects. Situated just outside Oslo, the school was recently renovated, with some 40,000 square feet of new construction. The colored panels suggest a sunny optimism, something the architects hoped to imbue in an educational context. Photo by: Ivan Brodey.

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  In 1970, Kari K. Holm had first pick among her siblings of the family land on Hanko, an island 60 miles south of her Oslo, Norway, home. After much consideration, she and her husband, German-born architect Jürgen Kiehl, selected an area at the farthest, most remote, exposed tip, where the tree line abruptly ends and nothing obstructs the open view. Photo by: Pia Ulin.

    In 1970, Kari K. Holm had first pick among her siblings of the family land on Hanko, an island 60 miles south of her Oslo, Norway, home. After much consideration, she and her husband, German-born architect Jürgen Kiehl, selected an area at the farthest, most remote, exposed tip, where the tree line abruptly ends and nothing obstructs the open view. Photo by: Pia Ulin.

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  We visit Oslo, Norway, a sleepy capital perched by the sea, that is in the midst of an architectural surge. The old port and the new opera house are just two examples of why Norway’s capital is pointing the way fjordward. Photo by: Jens Passoth.    This originally appeared in European Vacation.

    We visit Oslo, Norway, a sleepy capital perched by the sea, that is in the midst of an architectural surge. The old port and the new opera house are just two examples of why Norway’s capital is pointing the way fjordward. Photo by: Jens Passoth.

    This originally appeared in European Vacation.
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