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Alaska's Best Modern Homes

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It may be the last bastion of the American Way in the frigid north, but Alaska is also home to some stunning modern homes. We visited one amazing Alaskan house in our July/August 2013 issue. Here are a few more, and some amazing hunting cabins, from the Last Frontier.
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  Perched on top of a hill, the House for a Musher by Mayer Sattler-Smith is accessed by a long staircase that runs up to the exterior courtyard. The dogs, naturally, take their own route. Photo by: Kamil Bialous  Photo by: Kamil Bialous

    Perched on top of a hill, the House for a Musher by Mayer Sattler-Smith is accessed by a long staircase that runs up to the exterior courtyard. The dogs, naturally, take their own route. Photo by: Kamil Bialous

    Photo by: Kamil Bialous

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  “I always wanted to live in a glass house,” explains Valerie Phelps of her Alaskan abode by Mayer Sattler-Smith, as she stands surrounded by the 40 feet of floor-to-ceiling windows that are the only walls of her living room. Laid out in a 270-degree panorama in front of her is the frosty expanse of Cook Inlet, cascading rocky mountains, and a white sun as big as a dinner plate. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    “I always wanted to live in a glass house,” explains Valerie Phelps of her Alaskan abode by Mayer Sattler-Smith, as she stands surrounded by the 40 feet of floor-to-ceiling windows that are the only walls of her living room. Laid out in a 270-degree panorama in front of her is the frosty expanse of Cook Inlet, cascading rocky mountains, and a white sun as big as a dinner plate. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  Architect Steve Bull designed a high-impact, low-maintenance home for a pair of intrepid clients in Alaska, but that was only the beginning of the adventure. Photo by: Erik Johnson  Photo by: Erik Johnson

    Architect Steve Bull designed a high-impact, low-maintenance home for a pair of intrepid clients in Alaska, but that was only the beginning of the adventure. Photo by: Erik Johnson

    Photo by: Erik Johnson

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  In the summer of 2010, photographer Eirik Johnson adventured to the most northern stretch of the United States to capture several hunting cabins in Barrow, Alaska. He returned in winter 2012 during the frigid Arctic Winter Solstice to photograph the same cabins at the precise angle and position, as he did that one summer. With only a brief four hour window of dusk-like light during this recent winter trip, he still managed to succeed in a complete visual contrast, especially when the images are viewed side by side.  Photo by: Eirik Johnson
    In the summer of 2010, photographer Eirik Johnson adventured to the most northern stretch of the United States to capture several hunting cabins in Barrow, Alaska. He returned in winter 2012 during the frigid Arctic Winter Solstice to photograph the same cabins at the precise angle and position, as he did that one summer. With only a brief four hour window of dusk-like light during this recent winter trip, he still managed to succeed in a complete visual contrast, especially when the images are viewed side by side.

    Photo by: Eirik Johnson

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