7 Modern Residential Architecture Rebels

written by:
June 14, 2013
Modern homes that buck the expected vernacular? Sign us up. See an array of residences from Boise to Charleston that express unconventional twists on regional styles.
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  Modern homes that buck the expected vernacular? Sign us up. See an array of residences from Boise to Charleston that express unconventional twists on regional styles. The front of a 1910 house in Boise belies the modern extension architects Doug Skidmore and Heidi Beebe created to extend the family’s living space. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.  Photo by: Lincoln BarbourCourtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

    Modern homes that buck the expected vernacular? Sign us up. See an array of residences from Boise to Charleston that express unconventional twists on regional styles.

     

    The front of a 1910 house in Boise belies the modern extension architects Doug Skidmore and Heidi Beebe created to extend the family’s living space. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Photo by: Lincoln Barbour

    Courtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

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  Since the house is in a historic district, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.  Photo by: Lincoln BarbourCourtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

    Since the house is in a historic district, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Photo by: Lincoln Barbour

    Courtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

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  The nineteenth-century structure belonging to Helen Rice and Josh Nissenboim is commonly known as a classic "Charleston single." Photo by: Daniel Shea.  Photo by: Daniel Shea

    The nineteenth-century structure belonging to Helen Rice and Josh Nissenboim is commonly known as a classic "Charleston single." Photo by: Daniel Shea.

    Photo by: Daniel Shea

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  Inside the historic shell, the residents created a modern kitchen. The trio of pendant lamps hanging above the counter came from Schoolhouse Electric Co. and were reworked by designer Peyton Avrett to fit the width of the header beam to which they are attached. The bar stools were gifted from a friend. Photo by Daniel Shea.  Photo by: Daniel Shea

    Inside the historic shell, the residents created a modern kitchen. The trio of pendant lamps hanging above the counter came from Schoolhouse Electric Co. and were reworked by designer Peyton Avrett to fit the width of the header beam to which they are attached. The bar stools were gifted from a friend. Photo by Daniel Shea.

    Photo by: Daniel Shea

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  The exterior of this 1878 Victorian offers little insight into its new, expansive, light-filled interior. The house even keeps its solar-powered personality under wraps, with its panels tucked neatly­ (and unnoticeably) behind its low-pitched roof. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    The exterior of this 1878 Victorian offers little insight into its new, expansive, light-filled interior. The house even keeps its solar-powered personality under wraps, with its panels tucked neatly­ (and unnoticeably) behind its low-pitched roof. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  The walnut cabinets in the kitchen, which update and warm the space, were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    The walnut cabinets in the kitchen, which update and warm the space, were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  A dramatic trellis adds bravado and a passive cooling element to a recently renovated mid-century ranch house in Nashville, Tennessee. Despite its location in a traditional neighborhood, the house receives far more cheers than jeers from visitors and passersby. “Our house is contemporary, but also rooted in local tradition,” resident Brett Babat says.  Photo by: Anthony Matula

    A dramatic trellis adds bravado and a passive cooling element to a recently renovated mid-century ranch house in Nashville, Tennessee. Despite its location in a traditional neighborhood, the house receives far more cheers than jeers from visitors and passersby. “Our house is contemporary, but also rooted in local tradition,” resident Brett Babat says.

    Photo by: Anthony Matula

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  Built in 1922, the classic Cape Cod–style house of architect Christian Dean fits into its traditional Linden Hills, Minneapolis, neighborhood.  Photo by: Chad Holder

    Built in 1922, the classic Cape Cod–style house of architect Christian Dean fits into its traditional Linden Hills, Minneapolis, neighborhood.

    Photo by: Chad Holder

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  Dean built an extenstion onto the back of the house. From the outside, the shingle-clad box looks like it's part of the original strucutre. From within, it boasts a contemporary flair.  Photo by: Chad Holder

    Dean built an extenstion onto the back of the house. From the outside, the shingle-clad box looks like it's part of the original strucutre. From within, it boasts a contemporary flair.

    Photo by: Chad Holder

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  After a year of searching for the impossible, Santiago Suarez tripped over an ad in the local newspaper—“Church for Sale!”—went to the open house “out of curiosity,” and bought the 19th-century structure, once home to a Baptist congregation, the next day.  Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    After a year of searching for the impossible, Santiago Suarez tripped over an ad in the local newspaper—“Church for Sale!”—went to the open house “out of curiosity,” and bought the 19th-century structure, once home to a Baptist congregation, the next day.

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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  With the free-floating birch pod defining the space, and the massive Venetian chandelier accentuating the volume, the great room is, indeed, great. The Suarezes wanted the living area to be a place where the family could be occupied individually while still together. Bonnie works in the kitchen while Santiago (seated on an IKEA couch borrowed from one of their sons until they find something else) works on the computer. Photo by: Juliana Sohn  Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    With the free-floating birch pod defining the space, and the massive Venetian chandelier accentuating the volume, the great room is, indeed, great. The Suarezes wanted the living area to be a place where the family could be occupied individually while still together. Bonnie works in the kitchen while Santiago (seated on an IKEA couch borrowed from one of their sons until they find something else) works on the computer. Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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  With its porches and rows of windows, the still-legible schoolhouse is unwaveringly 19th century. A pair of photographers sought to transform the aging strucutre into a modern marvel.

    With its porches and rows of windows, the still-legible schoolhouse is unwaveringly 19th century. A pair of photographers sought to transform the aging strucutre into a modern marvel.

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  To accommodate his passion for cooking, resident Richard Renaldi insisted on the long Carrara marble countertop, a niche for cookware, and ultra-contemporary appliances.

    To accommodate his passion for cooking, resident Richard Renaldi insisted on the long Carrara marble countertop, a niche for cookware, and ultra-contemporary appliances.

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