6 Homes Blending Indoor and Outdoor Living Space

written by:
July 29, 2013
  • 
  SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL By keeping the front and back gardens at the same elevation as the living area, Kogan created one giant living space. A large overhang means that even on a rainy day, the Cósers can live practically without walls. Photo by: Cristóbal Palma  Photo by Cristóbal Palma.   This originally appeared in São Paulo, Brazil.

    SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    By keeping the front and back gardens at the same elevation as the living area, Kogan created one giant living space. A large overhang means that even on a rainy day, the Cósers can live practically without walls.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    Photo by Cristóbal Palma.
    This originally appeared in São Paulo, Brazil.
  • 
  MUTUAL FULFILMENT In his writing geared toward builders, A. Quincy Jones encouraged using large panes of glass and sliding doors to bridge the exterior and interior. Here, Nick Roberts puts the philosophy to good use for a weekend barbecue. Photo by: Darcy Hemley  Photo by Darcy Hemley.   This originally appeared in Mutual Fulfilment.

    MUTUAL FULFILMENT

    In his writing geared toward builders, A. Quincy Jones encouraged using large panes of glass and sliding doors to bridge the exterior and interior. Here, Nick Roberts puts the philosophy to good use for a weekend barbecue.

    Photo by: Darcy Hemley

    Photo by Darcy Hemley.
    This originally appeared in Mutual Fulfilment.
  • 
  THE FAMILY TREE This San Diego family enjoys their kitchen, which spills out onto their backyard deck. Photo by: Noah Webb  Photo by Noah Webb.   This originally appeared in The Family Tree.

    THE FAMILY TREE

    This San Diego family enjoys their kitchen, which spills out onto their backyard deck.

    Photo by: Noah Webb

    Photo by Noah Webb.
    This originally appeared in The Family Tree.
  • 
  NET ASSETS Dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the master bedroom a warm, peaceful feel. Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy. Photo by: Cristóbal Palma  Photo by Cristóbal Palma.   This originally appeared in Net Assets.

    NET ASSETS

    Dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the master bedroom a warm, peaceful feel. Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    Photo by Cristóbal Palma.
    This originally appeared in Net Assets.
  • 
  PROJECT: LIVE WORK HOME Richard Cook, a principal at Cook + Fox Architects, surveyed the Near Westside’s inventory of vacant structures and arrived at a conclusion that would guide the design of the Live Work Home. Cook’s team designed a single-story space with an open layout. Sliding doors and mobile partitions on wheels can be configured to create different layouts for living and working, eliminating the costs and landfill waste associated with residential remodeling.  Photo by Richard Barnes. Courtesy of © Richard Barnes.  This originally appeared in Near Westside Story.

    PROJECT: LIVE WORK HOME

    Richard Cook, a principal at Cook + Fox Architects, surveyed the Near Westside’s inventory of vacant structures and arrived at a conclusion that would guide the design of the Live Work Home. Cook’s team designed a single-story space with an open layout. Sliding doors and mobile partitions on wheels can be configured to create different layouts for living and working, eliminating the costs and landfill waste associated with residential remodeling.

    Photo by Richard Barnes. Courtesy of © Richard Barnes.
    This originally appeared in Near Westside Story.
  • 
  THOSE IN GLASS HOUSES “Creating efficient space is valuable, but for us, rooms that offer visual and spatial continuity with nature are also important,” architect Julie Dowling explains. “When the sliding doors are open, the living room and kitchen double in size.” Photo by: Matthew Millman  Photo by Matthew Millman.   This originally appeared in Sustainable Glass House in Sonoma.

    THOSE IN GLASS HOUSES

    “Creating efficient space is valuable, but for us, rooms that offer visual and spatial continuity with nature are also important,” architect Julie Dowling explains. “When the sliding doors are open, the living room and kitchen double in size.”

    Photo by: Matthew Millman

    Photo by Matthew Millman.
    This originally appeared in Sustainable Glass House in Sonoma.
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