6 Airy Attic Renovations

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June 12, 2013
With a little ingenuity, attics under the eaves can be transformed into bright, light living spaces. Read Full Article
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  This four-level penthouse apartment in New York has some quieter moments (to contrast with the multistory reflective slide snaking throughout). Designed by architect David Hotson_Architect with interiors by Ghislaine Viñas, this top-floor bedroom is a minty moment of repose. Set into the dormer at the opposite side of the bedroom, the alcove bed occupies a wedge of space extending up to the attic-level oculus window. Photo: David Hotson.  Courtesy of: David Hotson
    This four-level penthouse apartment in New York has some quieter moments (to contrast with the multistory reflective slide snaking throughout). Designed by architect David Hotson_Architect with interiors by Ghislaine Viñas, this top-floor bedroom is a minty moment of repose. Set into the dormer at the opposite side of the bedroom, the alcove bed occupies a wedge of space extending up to the attic-level oculus window. Photo: David Hotson.

    Courtesy of: David Hotson

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  Mike McDonald, an Oakland, California–based builder, faced a common problem for Bay Area homeowners: an aesthetically pleasing, historically significant, but structurally shaky Victorian. So he lifted the structure, added a basement sublayer for his office, and topped it all office with a new attic addition (pictured). Photo by: Jason Madara  Photo by: Jason Madara

    Mike McDonald, an Oakland, California–based builder, faced a common problem for Bay Area homeowners: an aesthetically pleasing, historically significant, but structurally shaky Victorian. So he lifted the structure, added a basement sublayer for his office, and topped it all office with a new attic addition (pictured). Photo by: Jason Madara

    Photo by: Jason Madara

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  Frequent Dwell architect-subjects El Dorado, Inc. of Kansas City, Missouri, completed this attic renovation in Kansas suburb Leawood. The Tyler family challenged the firm to add a playroom, a bedroom, and storage to their existing home without modifying the volume and footprint.  Courtesy of: El Dorado, Inc.
    Frequent Dwell architect-subjects El Dorado, Inc. of Kansas City, Missouri, completed this attic renovation in Kansas suburb Leawood. The Tyler family challenged the firm to add a playroom, a bedroom, and storage to their existing home without modifying the volume and footprint.

    Courtesy of: El Dorado, Inc.

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  The snug attic of a former fisherman's cottage outside of Copenhagen, designed by Norm. Architects, contains a platform bed, custom designed by Bjerre-Poulsen to maximize storage and fit the unusual space. Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen  Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

    The snug attic of a former fisherman's cottage outside of Copenhagen, designed by Norm. Architects, contains a platform bed, custom designed by Bjerre-Poulsen to maximize storage and fit the unusual space. Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

    Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

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  In the same Copenhagen apartment, a small bed for the daughter of the family is tucked under the eaves on the other side of the photo wall. Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen  Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

    In the same Copenhagen apartment, a small bed for the daughter of the family is tucked under the eaves on the other side of the photo wall. Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

    Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

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  In the tiny sleeping loft of this attic studio in Stockholm, a platform bed with two drawers beneath sits under a photograph that the owner snapped in Rio de Janeiro. The inset spotlights and a small shelf at the end of the bed offer light and additional storage. Photo by Per Magnus Persson.

    In the tiny sleeping loft of this attic studio in Stockholm, a platform bed with two drawers beneath sits under a photograph that the owner snapped in Rio de Janeiro. The inset spotlights and a small shelf at the end of the bed offer light and additional storage. Photo by Per Magnus Persson.

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  In his Cambridge compound, architectural designer Beat Schenk eliminated the attic and several walls to create a more fluid and open space. Photo by: Adam Friedberg  Photo by: Adam Friedberg

    In his Cambridge compound, architectural designer Beat Schenk eliminated the attic and several walls to create a more fluid and open space. Photo by: Adam Friedberg

    Photo by: Adam Friedberg

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