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February 6, 2013
Known for its strength, durability, and diverse range of grains and colors, wood has been the undefeated provider of shelter and furnishing material for millennia. We take a look at five residences that bring a little bit of nature into their homes.
Stacked wood shelving unit in office

Randy Bishop is an avid record collector—Rolling Stones albums are a sought-after favorite—and he keeps his vinyl in this shelving unit "1.1," a reproduction of architect Omer Arbel’s first completed work, in his modern rural home in Canada. The kids can often be found playing video games at the desk in the great room, too.

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Originally appeared in Modern Angular Rural Family Home in Canada
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Light from windows on all four sides spills over the dining room’s custom-made teak table.

Light from windows on all four sides spills over the dining room’s custom-made teak table in this mountainside box house in Seoul, South Korea.

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Originally appeared in Seoul, South Korea
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Floor-to-ceiling wooden drawers with Sugatsune pulls

In the children's playroom of this lakeside prefab home in New Jersey, wooden floor-to-ceiling drawers with simple Sugatsune pulls are labeled with every kind of bric-à-brac, from Legos and Playmobil to action figures and stuffed animals.

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Courtesy of 
photograph by Mark Mahaney,all rights reserved
Originally appeared in A Lakeside Prefab in New Jersey
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The exposed-wood motif continues inside, where plywood walls, as well as Barache and his guests, keep things warm.

Plywood walls, a red-cedar-shingled door, and wooden furniture make up the kitchen/dining room in this off-the-grid A-frame retreat in Auvilliers, France.

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Originally appeared in Modern Wooden A-Frame Retreat in France
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Black and blond are a natural match in Bornstein's largely wooden kitchen.

Sculptural wooden dining chairs by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen and a table designed by the architect and homeowner, Per Bornstein, occupy the blonde and black kitchen of this small home in Gothenburg, Sweden.

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Originally appeared in Knotty by Nature
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Stacked wood shelving unit in office

Randy Bishop is an avid record collector—Rolling Stones albums are a sought-after favorite—and he keeps his vinyl in this shelving unit "1.1," a reproduction of architect Omer Arbel’s first completed work, in his modern rural home in Canada. The kids can often be found playing video games at the desk in the great room, too.

Photo by Jason Schmidt.

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