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February 21, 2013
Architecture firm Olson Kundig is known for designing homes that allow residents to be as integrated or removed from nature as they'd like to be. For example, a writer's retreat in Washington features shutters that fold down to reveal floor-to-ceiling glass walls; an office building boasts massive hand-cranked doors; and Idaho house's pièce de résistance is a retractable glass wall. Photographs can capture the various states of flux, but this stop-motion video by Kevin Scott of Röllerhaus Pictureworks and Design Co. and Seattle-based composer Joshua Kohl of the Shadowboxx house on Washington's San Juan Islands show just how amazingly adaptable Olson Kundig's designs can be—kind of like kinetic sculptures built for living.
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  According to the architects, the Shadowboxx house "purposely confuses the traditional boundaries between a built structure and its surroundings." The roof over the batroom can be raised an lowered at will.

    According to the architects, the Shadowboxx house "purposely confuses the traditional boundaries between a built structure and its surroundings." The roof over the batroom can be raised an lowered at will.

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shadowboxx roof

According to the architects, the Shadowboxx house "purposely confuses the traditional boundaries between a built structure and its surroundings." The roof over the batroom can be raised an lowered at will.

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