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February 22, 2013
Hour-long commutes. Flaky public transportation. The congestion of crowds. It's no wonder many folk choose to work from home these days. These six creatures of comfort prove that their respective live/work spaces are worth the stay.
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  An installation by Willem Cole hangs in the gallery of this Antwerp residence/art gallery housed in a merged 19th-century and 1970s building, which leads to an open stairway to the office and private bedrooms upstairs. Photo by: Tim Van de Velde  Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    An installation by Willem Cole hangs in the gallery of this Antwerp residence/art gallery housed in a merged 19th-century and 1970s building, which leads to an open stairway to the office and private bedrooms upstairs. Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Photo by Tim Van de Velde.
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  Architect Mark Dixon inspects a drawing in the shared office of his renovated mid-19th-century duplexed home in Brooklyn, New York, which he shares with partner, architecture critic and author, Alexandra Lange. The space features a sloping ceiling that rises to ten feet at one end. The new wood of the inserted ceiling counterpoints the vintage pumpkin pine floorboards underfoot. Photo by: Matthew Williams  Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.

    Architect Mark Dixon inspects a drawing in the shared office of his renovated mid-19th-century duplexed home in Brooklyn, New York, which he shares with partner, architecture critic and author, Alexandra Lange. The space features a sloping ceiling that rises to ten feet at one end. The new wood of the inserted ceiling counterpoints the vintage pumpkin pine floorboards underfoot. Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.
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  In Oakland, California, two converted shipping containers (left) now house offices for Stephen Shoup’s design/build firm. “Perhaps the most successful aspect of turning this into a place to live and an office rather than just have this shop space was moving it towards real indoor-outdoor living,” he says. Taya Shoup, a landscape designer, has refined her husband’s vision for the property with a courtyard and plantings. Photo by: building Lab inc.

    In Oakland, California, two converted shipping containers (left) now house offices for Stephen Shoup’s design/build firm. “Perhaps the most successful aspect of turning this into a place to live and an office rather than just have this shop space was moving it towards real indoor-outdoor living,” he says. Taya Shoup, a landscape designer, has refined her husband’s vision for the property with a courtyard and plantings. Photo by: building Lab inc.

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  Needing a bigger place to work—and more room for his ever-expanding archive, Lawrence Weiner (seen here), a pioneer in 20th-century conceptual art, and wife Alice, moved into and renovated this three-story house in the West Village, New York. The bare walls are perfect for tacking up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel. Photo by: Dean Kaufman  Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Needing a bigger place to work—and more room for his ever-expanding archive, Lawrence Weiner (seen here), a pioneer in 20th-century conceptual art, and wife Alice, moved into and renovated this three-story house in the West Village, New York. The bare walls are perfect for tacking up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Photo by Dean Kaufman.
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  Yurika Ninomiya peeps out from the third-floor bedroom of her modern box home, while husband Takuya opens up the shop and gallery that they run below in Nagoya, Japan. Photo by: Takashi Homma  Photo by Takashi Homma.

    Yurika Ninomiya peeps out from the third-floor bedroom of her modern box home, while husband Takuya opens up the shop and gallery that they run below in Nagoya, Japan. Photo by: Takashi Homma

    Photo by Takashi Homma.
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  White paint lightens up the middle of the building in this Toronto live/work studio space, while a skylight provides crucial natural lighting. A vintage Danish dining set and Cloud pendants by Frank Gehry for Vitra define the space. Photo by: Matthew Williams  Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.

    White paint lightens up the middle of the building in this Toronto live/work studio space, while a skylight provides crucial natural lighting. A vintage Danish dining set and Cloud pendants by Frank Gehry for Vitra define the space. Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.
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Open stairway by home office

An installation by Willem Cole hangs in the gallery of this Antwerp residence/art gallery housed in a merged 19th-century and 1970s building, which leads to an open stairway to the office and private bedrooms upstairs. Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

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