written by:
February 25, 2013
From white exteriors to interiors, these homeowners know how to illuminate their space by using minimal color. As previously explored in Color Story: White, take a closer look at these working white wonders.
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  When Jennifer and Mattias Segerholt decided to move to Portland after five years in Los Angeles, a shared climate-based trepidation shaped their real estate search. Take a closer look at how natural light filters into their home. Photo by: John Clark

    When Jennifer and Mattias Segerholt decided to move to Portland after five years in Los Angeles, a shared climate-based trepidation shaped their real estate search. Take a closer look at how natural light filters into their home. Photo by: John Clark

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  In the center of this modern, open kitchen, a wood-clad iron cube rises 13.12 feet high. The wood was purchased from a crane company that unloads wood containers at the port. The cube contains the main systems and functions of the house.

    In the center of this modern, open kitchen, a wood-clad iron cube rises 13.12 feet high. The wood was purchased from a crane company that unloads wood containers at the port. The cube contains the main systems and functions of the house.

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  Built in 1938, this home faces the stretching coastline of Cohasset, Massachusetts. Early on, the house's simplicity had great appeal to Jan Sasseen, the current owner. From walls to rugs to furniture, "pretty much everything is white," she says. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Built in 1938, this home faces the stretching coastline of Cohasset, Massachusetts. Early on, the house's simplicity had great appeal to Jan Sasseen, the current owner. From walls to rugs to furniture, "pretty much everything is white," she says. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  New York resident Lawrence Weiner sits at his day lit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    New York resident Lawrence Weiner sits at his day lit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The best way to integrate different furniture styles is to treat “the space like a gallery and place objects according to their colors,” internationally acclaimed designer Jaime Hayon says. He cautions against using too much natural wood furniture in a space with wood floors: “You need contrast.” In his newly renovated home in Valencia, Spain, contrasting materials, small porcelain objects, and an occasional black form enliven a palette of light gray furniture. Photo by: Nienke Klunder

    The best way to integrate different furniture styles is to treat “the space like a gallery and place objects according to their colors,” internationally acclaimed designer Jaime Hayon says. He cautions against using too much natural wood furniture in a space with wood floors: “You need contrast.” In his newly renovated home in Valencia, Spain, contrasting materials, small porcelain objects, and an occasional black form enliven a palette of light gray furniture. Photo by: Nienke Klunder

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  For this duo of young architects behind the firm Atherton Keener, the harsh, ever-changing light of Phoenix, Arizona, desert served as inspiration for their minimal and malleable home. Photo by: Ye Rin Mok  Photo by Ye Rin Mok.

    For this duo of young architects behind the firm Atherton Keener, the harsh, ever-changing light of Phoenix, Arizona, desert served as inspiration for their minimal and malleable home. Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

    Photo by Ye Rin Mok.
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Modern deck with peaked ceiling and wooden flooring

When Jennifer and Mattias Segerholt decided to move to Portland after five years in Los Angeles, a shared climate-based trepidation shaped their real estate search. Take a closer look at how natural light filters into their home. Photo by: John Clark

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