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March 8, 2013
In honor of International Women's Day (today!), we're celebrating ten brilliant women in design as featured in Dwell. And, be sure to check out 25 more women in design here.
Hella Jongerius designer in her studio

Multitalented Dutch designer Hella Jongerius's genre-shattering work combines craft and technology, tradition and innovation, and high and low tech, ranging from mass-produced items for Swedish mass furniture ware shop Ikea and unique art pieces for galleries. Seen here, the designer lounging inside her Berlin studio, Jongeriuslab. Photo by: Oliver Mark

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© 2011 Oliver Mark
Originally appeared in Dutch Designer Focus: Hella Jongerius
1 / 19
<h2><p>1997</h2></p><p>B-Set porcelain tableware launches a long-running collaboration with Royal Tichelaar Makkum.</p>

A muted porcelain tableware set by Royal Tichelaar Makkum. Photo by: Oliver Mark

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Originally appeared in Dutch Designer Focus: Hella Jongerius
2 / 19
modern jewelry designer margaret de patta portrait

The late Margaret De Patta (1903–1964) was one of the 20th century's most seminal jewelry designers. Originally trained as a painter in her native California, De Patta turned to jewelery making after crafting her own wedding band in 1929. Since then, she's been churning out bold, carefully crafted and conscious-driven wearable pieces of art.

Originally appeared in Modernist Jewelry by Margaret De Patta
3 / 19
modernist jewelry designer margaret de patta stainless steel pin

A 1964 angular pin De Patta made from sterling silver and polished beach pebbles.

Originally appeared in Modernist Jewelry by Margaret De Patta
4 / 19

Since 2006, Danish product and furniture designer Nina Tolstrup of Studiomama has been making quite a name for herself since relocating to the UK. “I had no contacts or networks here,” Tolstrup recalls. “I just picked up the phone and called Habitat and asked to speak to Tom Dixon.” Dixon fortunately took that call and later commisoned her to design a range of bathroom accessories made from half-inch stainless steel tubes. Following her inital success and a brief four years off to be with her family, Tolstrup came back with a bang—she placed first at Design Nation's Eureka exhibition and picked up the Best Contribution award at London's 100% Design Festivial in 2007. Most recently, she just completed renovating an aging London workshop with her husband, Jack Mama, a creative director specializing in sustainability. Photo by: Ben Anders

 

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Originally appeared in A Mama's Touch
5 / 19
Modern living room with Studiomama floor lamp and wooden flooring

The living room in 2 Voss Street located on a corner of London's East End, was designed and constructed by Studiomama. Various products from Studiomama such as the 1 x 1 floor lamp and Castaway animals for art company Phillips de Pury dress up the renovated space. Photo by: Ben Anders

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Originally appeared in A Colorful, Custom-Built Guesthouse in London
6 / 19
Brooklyn designers Crystal Ellis, Stephanie Beamer, and Hillary Petrie of Egg Collective

Crystal Ellis, Stephanie Beamer, and Hillary Petrie are the three masterminds behind Brooklyn-based design studio Egg Collective. The three met while studying architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and have been collaborating ever since. Brass touches, repetition, and angularity are few characteristics found in their work. Most recently, the studio was recently honored with the ICFF Editors' Award for Best New Designer.

Originally appeared in New Furniture from Egg Collective
7 / 19
Modern table by Brooklyn design studio Egg Collective

The trio's blackened steel based Bradford table plays to the theme of individual pieces that can be grouped as a whole. Prices range from $610 for the triangular wood-topped table to $1,290 for the stone hexagon.

Originally appeared in New Furniture from Egg Collective
8 / 19
Chandra Greer of Greer

In 2005, Chandra Greer opened up a Chicago shop dedicated to all things letterpress and screenprint designs. “We like to think of ourselves as a lifestyle store grounded in stationery. We’re not interested in ‘what sells’; we’re interested in what allows our customers to express themselves and to make deep, personal connections in the most lovely, distinctive, and powerful ways possible. There’s a lot in the world that can bring people down. We want to lift people up," says Greer. Photo by: Nathan Kirkman

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Originally appeared in To the Letter
9 / 19
Letterpress goods at Greer in Chicago

A colorful bevy of Greer's best-selling products, often produced in small batches by artisan crafters. Photo by: Nathan Kirkman

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Originally appeared in To the Letter
10 / 19
Philanthropist and Workshop Residence founder Ann Hatch

Since the 1980s, San Francisco philanthropist Ann Hatch has been a critical figure of the arts. She founded the Capp Street Project, an arts residency in the Mission district, cofounded the Oxbow School, an arts program for high school students in Napa, California, and most recently, the Workshop Residence launched in August 2011. For up to two months, Ann Hatch invites an artist to brainstorm, design, and create bespoke products to later make available for sale to the public. Recent invited artists include Belgian fashion designer Dirk van Saene, Paris fashion designer and artist Aurore Thibout, and SF-based graphic designer Jennifer Morla. Photo by: Christie Hemm

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Originally appeared in Maker's Mark
11 / 19
Interior of Workshop Residence in San Francisco

This past spring, Hatch invited California College of the Arts graphic design professor Jennifer Morla to create textiles (hanging on the wall).

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Originally appeared in Maker's Mark
12 / 19
Monica Forster in her Stockholk studio

Swedish designer Monica Förster's work (here in her Stockholm studio) can best be characterized as experimental with a keen curiousity for new materials and technology. Förster has been awarded numerous awards such as the Future Designer Days Award and Designer of the Year, Sweden. Clients include Cappellini, Tacchini, E&Y Japan, and Offecct. Photo by: Felix Odell

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Originally appeared in Swedish Designer Focus: Monica Förster
13 / 19
Monica Forster’s studio front room and showroom

Open to the public for three days a week, Förster's makeshift showroom in her studio features the designer's yellow Cirle lamp, an asymmetrical Drop stool, Umbrella pendant lamp, Mix bowls and vases, and a mauve Spoon chair. Photo by: Felix Odell

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Originally appeared in Swedish Designer Focus: Monica Förster
14 / 19
Vintage Scandinavian furniture Carl Jacobs Jason chairs

Interior designer Kathryn Tyler (seen here at her home in Fakniyth, England) founded Linea Studio in 2004. Since then, the UK-based designer has been outfitting various interiors such as a oak slatted cafe, a secondary school in Cornwall, and The Falmouth Townhouse. Photo by: Andrew Meredith

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Courtesy of 
Andrew Meredith 2007
Originally appeared in English Designer's Live/Work Home
15 / 19
The Hub Bar and Kitchen furnished by Kathryn Tyler

The Hub Bar and Kitchen is located in St Ives, Cornwall. Tyler juxtaposed timber clad walls reminiscent of yacht interiors with vintage fabrics for a "50s gentlemen's club-at-sea feel." Photo by Lara Kay.

Originally appeared in Interiors by Kathryn Tyler, Linea Studio
16 / 19
Curator Zoe Ryan, posing for our <a href="http://www.dwell.com/magazine/Young-Americans.html">December/January 2011</a> Young Guns feature.

London-born Zoë Ryan has been bringing her sharp curatorial eye to the design circuit of museums and galleries around the world, such as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. “Shows are never about a single work,” Ryan says. “They’re about the relationships between them all. I see the gallery less as an end point, and more as the point at which we, and the public, really start to explore.” Photo by: David Robert Elliot

Originally appeared in Zoe Ryan on Hyperlinks at AIC
17 / 19
Mojgan Hariri and Gisue Hariri illustration by Jonathan Puckey

Gisue Hariri and Mojgan Hariri, founders of the New York–based firm Hariri & Hariri, spent their childhood years growing up in rural Iran building “primitive architecture” with chicken wire, plastic tarp, cinderblocks, and scrap wood. “We didn’t have many toys but we had a lot of outdoor space, so every day we’d create an environment. That kind of freedom, having the outlook that you can make anything and create your own world—that definitely planted the seed of who we are today.”  Today, they are at the top of their game as the heads of one of the most progresive architecture firms in the United States. Projects range from single-family houses to luxury apartment complexes. Illustration by: Jonathan Puckey

Originally appeared in Mojgan Hariri and Gisue Hariri
18 / 19
Sternbrauerei residential development in Salzburg, Australia

The Sternbrauerei residential development in Salzburg, Austria (seen here), inspired the faceted, gemlike fixtures they created for AFNY and Rapsel’s Crystalline Bath Collection and their Swarovski-fabricated Kryptonite jewelry collection. “We’ve always liked to have continuity and flow, where everything starts to relate to each other in language, form, and materials.”

Originally appeared in Mojgan Hariri and Gisue Hariri
19 / 19
Hella Jongerius designer in her studio

Multitalented Dutch designer Hella Jongerius's genre-shattering work combines craft and technology, tradition and innovation, and high and low tech, ranging from mass-produced items for Swedish mass furniture ware shop Ikea and unique art pieces for galleries. Seen here, the designer lounging inside her Berlin studio, Jongeriuslab. Photo by: Oliver Mark

Photo by Oliver Mark. Image courtesy of © 2011 Oliver Mark .

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