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March 25, 2013

Sliding glass doors and walls take center stage in these 10 homes that seamlessly transition between indoors and out.

For more indoor-outdoor design ideas, pick up a copy of our April 2013 issue.

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  The floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors from Metal Window Corporation open up the entire corner of a modern Malibu house's bedroom to the outdoors. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.  Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

    The floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors from Metal Window Corporation open up the entire corner of a modern Malibu house's bedroom to the outdoors. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

    Photo by J Bennett Fitts.
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  Thomas Bercy selected sliding glass walls from Fleetwood for his Austin, Texas, house. “They’re a little more expensive, but when you slide the heavy doors open, you’re making a profound gesture to leave the house and step outside,” says Bercy.  Photo by Denise Prince Martin.

    Thomas Bercy selected sliding glass walls from Fleetwood for his Austin, Texas, house. “They’re a little more expensive, but when you slide the heavy doors open, you’re making a profound gesture to leave the house and step outside,” says Bercy.

    Photo by Denise Prince Martin.
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  The living and dining rooms of John and Cahty Dillon's Brisbane house are joined together in one large central space. When the sliding doors on either side of the room are open, cross-breezes flow through—a passive cooling technique that helps keep the interiors comfortable in the city's sub-tropical climate.  Photo by David Sandison.

    The living and dining rooms of John and Cahty Dillon's Brisbane house are joined together in one large central space. When the sliding doors on either side of the room are open, cross-breezes flow through—a passive cooling technique that helps keep the interiors comfortable in the city's sub-tropical climate.

    Photo by David Sandison.
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  Once past the main threshold, the Pentimento house  opens up to the outside, literally and figuratively. Three courtyards built around existing trees flow seamlessly into a series of rooms with glazed walls and sliding glass doors.  Photo by João Canziani. Courtesy of Joao Canziani.

    Once past the main threshold, the Pentimento house  opens up to the outside, literally and figuratively. Three courtyards built around existing trees flow seamlessly into a series of rooms with glazed walls and sliding glass doors.

    Photo by João Canziani. Courtesy of Joao Canziani.
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  On the first floor of architect Sebastian Mariscal's San Diego abode—site of the main social space, kitchen, and dining area—three of the four walls are formed by a 25-panel retractable glass NanaWall. Sliding on a hidden track and tucked out of sight in a glass storage closet, the NanaWall allows the glassed-in common space to morph into a massive outdoor living room in a matter of minutes. Photo by: Bryce Duffy  Photo by Bryce Duffy.

    On the first floor of architect Sebastian Mariscal's San Diego abode—site of the main social space, kitchen, and dining area—three of the four walls are formed by a 25-panel retractable glass NanaWall. Sliding on a hidden track and tucked out of sight in a glass storage closet, the NanaWall allows the glassed-in common space to morph into a massive outdoor living room in a matter of minutes.

    Photo by: Bryce Duffy

    Photo by Bryce Duffy.
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  The back of a Japan-inspired house in Scotland has sliding doors that open far enough to expose the entire livingroom to the families' back yard. Architect Kieran Gaffney purchased the door from Timber Tech.  Photo by Ben Anders.

    The back of a Japan-inspired house in Scotland has sliding doors that open far enough to expose the entire livingroom to the families' back yard. Architect Kieran Gaffney purchased the door from Timber Tech.

    Photo by Ben Anders.
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  Marmol Radziner designed this house in Ukiah, California so that its residents have “the ability to be indoors or outdoors with ease.”  Photo by Dwight Eschliman.

    Marmol Radziner designed this house in Ukiah, California so that its residents have “the ability to be indoors or outdoors with ease.”

    Photo by Dwight Eschliman.
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  The Jespersen residence sits in virtual isolation atop Emigration Canyon. With its oversize sliding glass doors, flat roof, and meticulous attention to geometric principles, the home creates a haven in the mountain wilderness.  Photo by Zubin Shroff.

    The Jespersen residence sits in virtual isolation atop Emigration Canyon. With its oversize sliding glass doors, flat roof, and meticulous attention to geometric principles, the home creates a haven in the mountain wilderness.

    Photo by Zubin Shroff.
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  The large windows in the background and throughout this house in Hollywood are from Western Window Systems.  Photo by Zen Sekizawa.

    The large windows in the background and throughout this house in Hollywood are from Western Window Systems.

    Photo by Zen Sekizawa.
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  This affordably designed vacation home located in Mexico features floor-to-ceiling sliding glass walls.  Photo by Mauricio Alejo.

    This affordably designed vacation home located in Mexico features floor-to-ceiling sliding glass walls.

    Photo by Mauricio Alejo.
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Modern bedroom office with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors

The floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors from Metal Window Corporation open up the entire corner of a modern Malibu house's bedroom to the outdoors. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

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