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July 26, 2012

Is the modernist's perfect companion a fluffy pooch? For the residents of these 15 homes—spanning a renovated farmhouse in the Italian countryside to a Chicago loft filled with epicurean delights—the answer is a resounding "yes." Just for fun, we've rounded up our favorite four-legged friends gracing the pages of Dwell. 

"The only way we can live in 400 square feet is because we thought out each detail and tried to make every space usable when we were designing the renovation," says Tolya and Stonorov who resides in this former barn with her husband, Otto, and son, Niko. Those details include a custom dog door for their Blue Heeler, Oscar. See more of the renovated small-space home.

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Originally appeared in Built-In Style
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Little boy with pet dog sitting on wooden floor

This photo from our February 2009 story "Take Me Home" includes three amazing things: a shaggy pup, tie-dye, and a George Nelson wall clock. See more of this 1,900-square-foot prefab cabin nestled in the sylvan foothills of West Virginia.

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Originally appeared in Take Me Home
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sitting area with E15 Shiraz short monochrome sofas

We recently featured this Atlanta, Georgia, renovation by architectural designer Barbara Hill. Here, one of the residents' rescued greyhounds prowls through the foyer. Don't miss all nine photos of the house.

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Originally appeared in Polished Minimalism: A Modern Abode in Atlanta
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family dining in modern kitchen

Standout elements of the Monfumo, Italy, abode of Guido and Sabrina Chiavelli include slate floors and a glass-roofed kitchen. Check out the entire renovation.

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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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Dining room with wood-and-metal long table

Bernese mountain dogs Vinnie and Stella have the run of Bill and Abbie Burton's Marmol Radziner–designed prefab retreat in Ukiah, California.

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Originally appeared in A Simple Plan
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Modern wooden doghouse

Paul and Shoko Shozi's dog, Mei. See more of their Marina del Rey prefab home.

Originally appeared in Looking Inward
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Modern backyard pool patio BBQ area

Though the front of this 1880s home in Adelaide, Australia, maintains a traditional facade due to strict heritage laws, the rear is modern eye candy at its best. See more of the home.

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Courtesy of 
James Knowler Photography
Originally appeared in Australian Bungalow with a Modern Addition
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All of the glazing along the house’s 95-foot-long western elevation can be opened to the out of doors.

Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene flipped a 1957 Arthur Witthoefft design that lost its luster through the years (it's hard to believe the before and after photos are of the same house). The two stocked the interiors with mid-century classics...and a French bulldog. Read the story here.

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Originally appeared in Mod Men
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Pork Chop, the dog, has plenty of comfortable places to nap between meals.

Pork Chop, the dog belonging to the gastronomes living in this Chicago loft, has plenty of comfortable places to nap between meals.

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Originally appeared in Chef's Table
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Sparano works in the dining area, where books about travel, architecture, and food, as well as framed architectural drawings from his grad school days, line the back wall. The hollow glass-walled light fixture is from Ikea; every few months, the family fi

Utah’s first LEED for Homes–rated house provides shelter for a family of five and their chocolate lab, Oso.

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Originally appeared in The First LEED for Homes–Rated House in Utah
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Auburn 7 developer and resident Michael Kyle hangs with his dog Moxy in the front yard of the unit owned by his codeveloper Todd Wexman; he is joined by residents Francisco, Camille, and young Sophia Apple Owens.

Auburn 7 developer and resident Michael Kyle hangs with his dog, Moxy. Read the full story.

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Originally appeared in Lucky 7
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A Dine family portrait in front of the loft clubhouse Nick and Vanessa built for their daughters. As the girls get older, the playroom will transform into a family office.

Another dog spotted! This time in the residence of designer Nick Dine.

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Originally appeared in Fine Dine-ing
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For the duo of young architects behind the firm Atherton Keener, the harsh, ever-changing light of Phoenix, Arizona, desert served as inspiration for their minimal and malleable home.

"There are some unconventional aspects to the house, but we’re also using it as an architecture studio, and a pavilion, and a warehouse. If we’re interested in something, we can bring it in and experiment with it. When we were working on an art installation, we had two 300-pound blocks of ice in a tub in the middle of the room. At one point there were 800 yards of fabric piled up. We have a dog, and when we had all that fabric lying around, he loved it, he was like “Oh my god, it’s furniture.” And then it was gone."—Jay Atherton, resident of this Phoenix, Arizona, house.

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Originally appeared in Startin' Spartan
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Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor.

Stefan Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor. Look closely and you'll see his pup watching from the lower deck. View the entire slideshow.

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Originally appeared in Hillside Family Home in Australia
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The outdoor hearth is primed for cooking in the summer.

One final friend to end the slideshow. See inside the Sebastopol house here.

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Originally appeared in Fertile Grounds
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stonorov house outside portrait thumbnail

"The only way we can live in 400 square feet is because we thought out each detail and tried to make every space usable when we were designing the renovation," says Tolya and Stonorov who resides in this former barn with her husband, Otto, and son, Niko. Those details include a custom dog door for their Blue Heeler, Oscar. See more of the renovated small-space home.

Photo by Aya Brackett.

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