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September 26, 2013
Everyone knows that window treatments can make or break a room but the windows are not the only place to use curtains in a home. Here, we take a look at some great examples of unique uses for curtains as well as a couple traditional uses that really do their job.
Open living room and bedroom with custom Manhattan Textiles curtain

Custom curtains by Manhattan Textiles delineate the kitchen and sleeping room from the main space in this Wisconsin vacation home. A Rais Pina wood-burning stove keeps things cozy on the West Elm Henry sofa and Eames lounge chairs.

Photo by Narayan Mahon.

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Originally appeared in A Stacked Cabin for a Steep Slope
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To make the bedroom seem ethereal—and far larger than its 12-by-12 dimensions suggest—this homeowner designed a curtain that hangs on three sides, hiding closets to the left and right of the bed and providing privacy when extended in front of the sliding glass doors. The bedspread, in charcoal with undulating turquoise stitching, recalls the folds of the curtain; the overall effect is of a place for floating off to sleep.

Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

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Originally appeared in Light Box
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Checking email over coffee, Hughston places his laptop on the fold-down Formica table that Sanders designed. Jack Lenor Larsen's Cybelle fabric covers the wall on his right. Above the sofa hangs an Italian pendant lamp of mysterious origin; if you recogni

This New Yorker keeps all his tableware behind a curtain, made of Jack Lenor Larsen's Cybelle fabric, on the shelves nearest the kitchen. The ample shelf space, covering the entire wall (except that taken up by the Murphy bed), makes it easy for him to avoid mess. The contrast of gold and turquoise is warm and lively.

Photo by Grant Delin.

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Originally appeared in One Room Fits All
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When residents want privacy (from the outside world or from other family members), sliding curtains, like this one dividing the office from the staircase, create temporary walls between rooms. "When you close the curtains, you can't see anything," says Wi

When residents of this Puyallup, Washington home want privacy (from the outside world or from other family members), sliding curtains, like this one dividing the office from the staircase, create temporary walls between rooms. "When you close the curtains, you can't see anything," says the homeowner. "It's more like Asian culture, where you don't want to show everything all at once. We want to be in control of what guests see."

Photo by John Clark.

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Originally appeared in Magic Mountain
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Shoe shelves covered with bamboo bead curtains

To cover up his shoe-storage shelves, this homeowner bought bamboo bead curtains from the Callaloo Company emblazoned with an image of the Madonna. He separated out every other strand to create two curtains from one, resulting in twinned pixelated images. The resulting pattern is “like a Chuck Close that everyone can afford,” says Sherman.

Photo by Dustin Aksland.

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Originally appeared in New Prospects
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Cinematic Family Retreat in São Paulo, Brazil

São Paulo architect Isay Weinfeld's Casa Deck offers cinematic vistas, a lush garden, and a retreat from Brazil's largest city. Weinfeld’s cinematic streak is also evident in the home’s interiors: he designed the entertainment center in the media room. The rug is from Clatt Carpete & Cia. Throughout the house, the homeowners use floor-to-ceiling curtains for privacy.

Photo by Matthew Williams.

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Originally appeared in Cinematic Family Retreat in Brazil
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A palette of soothing hues creates a calm mood in the bedroom of this family-friendly New York City apartment. The wallcoverings are from Innvironments, the bedcoverings are from Deborah Sharpe Linens, the curtains are Manuel Canovas and purchased from Cowan & Tout.

Photo by Ball & Albanese.

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Originally appeared in A Family-Friendly New York City Apartment
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Geothermal heating and cooling system

Two layers of aluminum woven-coil drapes hang outside the large, south-facing windows above the living area of this Long Island, sustainable second home.

Photo by Ty Cole.

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Courtesy of 
© TY COLE
Originally appeared in Green Sustainable Home in Montauk
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Open living room and bedroom with custom Manhattan Textiles curtain

Custom curtains by Manhattan Textiles delineate the kitchen and sleeping room from the main space in this Wisconsin vacation home. A Rais Pina wood-burning stove keeps things cozy on the West Elm Henry sofa and Eames lounge chairs.

Photo by Narayan Mahon.

Photo by Narayan Mahon.

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