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February 1, 2013
Though often pushed to the wayside, the rooms belonging to the littlest members of the family need not be ignored. Our editors have combed through the archives to find some favorites from years past.
Here, architect Marcus Lee maximized every bit of space in his London house by creating a third floor up in the eaves so that his girls—Mae, 6, Jodie, 8, and Ruby, 10—could have a study and three separate bedrooms.

<a href="http://www.dwell.c

Here, architect Marcus Lee maximized every bit of space in his London house by creating a third floor up in the eaves so that his girls—Mae, 6, Jodie, 8, and Ruby, 10—could have a study and three separate bedrooms. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Slanted and Enchanted
1 / 14
Only a set of sliding doors separates the kids’ room from the master bedroom in a Toronto, Ontario, home. When the time is right, there's a track inlaid in the ceiling for a four-panel bifold wall to divide the space into two private rooms for the childre

Only a set of sliding doors separates the kids’ room from the master bedroom in a Toronto, Ontario, home. When the time is right, there's a track inlaid in the ceiling for a four-panel bifold wall to divide the space into two private rooms for the children. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Inside Job
2 / 14
Eve works at the desk in her double-height bedroom. Vogt’s mythically aquatic-themed mural reflects both the taste of a young girl and the pared-back aesthetic of any modern enthusiast.

Eve works at the desk in her double-height bedroom, which is inside a renovated Minneapolis loft. Artist John Vogt's mythically aquatic-themed mural reflects both the taste of a young girl and the pared-back aesthetic of any modern enthusiast. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Keep Your Eye on the Balto
3 / 14
Moe and Lewis play in their shared bedroom, the former Madame Wong’s kitchen. “It’s just so fun for them to live in a funny place like this,” says Amy. “Their friends love to come over and play.”

Moe and Lewis play in their shared bedroom, a space that once served as a restaurant's kitchen, inside a 1940s warehouse in downtown Los Angeles. “It’s just so fun for them to live in a funny place like this,” says their mother, architect Amy Finn Bernier. “Their friends love to come over.” Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Sun Mun Way Cool
4 / 14
For his son's Boulder, Colorado, bedroom, architect Rob Pyatt chose low- to no-formaldehyde plywood, non-toxic adhesives, and zero-VOC paint, and staunchly avoided materials that are known to off-gas or contain toxic compounds, including carpeting on whic

For his son's Boulder, Colorado, bedroom, architect Rob Pyatt chose low- to no-formaldehyde plywood, non-toxic adhesives, and zero-VOC paint, and staunchly avoided materials that are known to off-gas or contain toxic compounds, including carpeting on which the kids would inevitably roll around and kick up particulates. Read the whole story here.

Originally appeared in Children's Bedrooms
5 / 14
Ella's bedroom sports walls covered in polka dots that JJ hand-cut from fabric.

Four-year-old Ella has a bedroom that sports walls covered in polka dots that her mother JJ hand-cut from fabric. The house, which is in Milwaukee, features a pitched roof and translucent windows filled with Nanogel, an insulating material. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Opened House
6 / 14
The boys’ bedroom is compact while providing room for sleep as well as study.

Architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka created a compact but efficiently scaled sleeping/studying area for two young brothers in Tokyo. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Family Style
7 / 14
Their son's bedroom features skillful use of ordinary birch-finished shelves from Ikea. The 1950s fiberglass shell chair is from Modernica.

Inside their Upper West Side co-op, architect Brad Zizmor and his wife, Susan, selected birch-finished shelves from Ikea and a 1950s fiberglass shell chair from Modernica for their son's bedroom. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Pretty Super
8 / 14
Finn's street-facing room at the front of the house is enlivened by varying window sizes.

Finn, a five-year-old living in an Amsterdam house designed by his father, architect Pieter Weijnen, peers out from his street-facing room at the front of the house. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Ship Shape
9 / 14
In the boys’ shared room, Jasper finds plenty of space to scatter toys. An original chandelier provides a reminder of the house’s past while muted orange walls plant it firmly in the present.

Jasper's room, which he shares with his younger brother, has a fourteen-foot-tall ceiling and lots of room to spread out. An original chandelier provides a reminder of the San Francisco house’s nineteenth-century past, while muted orange walls plant it firmly in the present. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Taking Liberties
10 / 14
Olivia's bedroom.

Nine-year-old Olivia straightens items on her bookshelves, which her father, architect Sebastian Mariscal, scaled just to her size. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Double the Pleasure
11 / 14

In 2002, London–based designers Kim Colin and Sam Hecht added a loft extension to their home, a crumbling 1924 garage. The new space provides accommodation for the couple's sons, Josh and Noah. The child-size Bertoia chair (just barely in the foreground) came from Colin’s childhood home in Los Angeles. Read the whole story here.

12 / 14
Young parents Ainsley Ryan and Chris Showalter created a freestanding OSB (oriented strand board) structure inside their Brooklyn, New York, apartment to house their daughter Tatum’s room, as well as their own connecting master bedroom. The crib is by Oeu

Young parents Ainsley Ryan and Chris Showalter created a freestanding OSB (oriented strand board) structure inside their Brooklyn, New York, apartment to house their daughter Tatum’s room, as well as their own connecting master bedroom. The crib is by Oeuf. Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Hive Minded
13 / 14
The kids’ rooms were designed to let the littlest Brenners express their own tastes. “When designing you need to accommodate lots of functions, from piano lessons to just hanging out,” says Phillips. “A house should have all the elements that allow you to

The kids’ rooms inside a Richmond, England, Victorian were designed to let the them express their own tastes. "When designing you need to accommodate lots of functions, from piano lessons to just hanging out," says architect Gregory Phillips. "A house should have all the elements that allow you to relax." Read the whole story here.

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Originally appeared in Victorian Secrets
14 / 14
Here, architect Marcus Lee maximized every bit of space in his London house by creating a third floor up in the eaves so that his girls—Mae, 6, Jodie, 8, and Ruby, 10—could have a study and three separate bedrooms.

<a href="http://www.dwell.c

Here, architect Marcus Lee maximized every bit of space in his London house by creating a third floor up in the eaves so that his girls—Mae, 6, Jodie, 8, and Ruby, 10—could have a study and three separate bedrooms. Read the whole story here.

Photo by Jeremy Murch.

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