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March 28, 2013
In our latest regional round-up—hope you caught our posts on New England and Belgium—we turn our attentions to Texas, an outsize state with a notorious maverick streak. From an affordable clutch of row houses in Houston to a cool-kid ranch with mid-century bones, this quintet of homes proves that when it comes to modern design, you might wanna mess with Texas.
Porch renovation with galvanized metal cladding

For a cost-conscious 2,000-square-foot renovation located 30 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, architect Nick Deaver took a look around for inspiration. He spied galvanized metal cladding on the region’s sheds and co-opted the inexpensive, resilient material for his own design.

Originally appeared in An Affordable Duplex Transformation in Texas
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Modern row houses in Houston, Texas
By taking advantage of economies of scale, a Houston native and Shade House Development teamed up to create nine affordable row houses in the Houston Heights.
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Originally appeared in Row on 25th: Affordable Housing Development in Houston
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Modern backyard area with raised and creased roof

Native Texans and married designers Elizabeth Alford and Michael Young came home to roost ten years ago, when they ditched big-city life in New York for a modern ranch house in Austin. The home, originally built by architect Jonathan Bowman in 1957, sits in a landscape of limestone cliffs in the Balcones fault zone, the geographical boundary between the prairie lands that extend all the way to the Gulf of Mexico and the rolling, agriculture-rich Hill Country.

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Originally appeared in Hillside Mid-Century Home Renovation in Texas
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Andy and Regina Rihn lean on their other blue-clad affordable design, a 1958 AMC Rambler Super station wagon, in front of their house in Austin, Texas.

Andy and Regina Rihn lean on their other blue-clad affordable design, a 1958 AMC Rambler Super station wagon, in front of their house in Austin, Texas.

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Originally appeared in A Lot for a Little
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Outside their homes on Throckmorton Street in Dallas, architect Edward Baum (right) and his neighbor admire the fruits of Baum’s labors.
Outside their homes on Throckmorton Street in Dallas, architect Edward Baum (right) and his neighbor admire the fruits of Baum’s labors. Photo by: Scogin Mayo
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Originally appeared in Developer Does Dallas
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Porch renovation with galvanized metal cladding

For a cost-conscious 2,000-square-foot renovation located 30 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, architect Nick Deaver took a look around for inspiration. He spied galvanized metal cladding on the region’s sheds and co-opted the inexpensive, resilient material for his own design.

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