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June 28, 2013
Though he's often lumped in as one of Joseph's Eichler's gang—and we certainly love what Eichler did for the modern tract home—architect A. Quincy Jones is a midcentury lion in his own right. And thanks to the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles's exhibit A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living the man is finally getting the Neutra-level esteem that he deserves. Jones is credited with over 5,000 built projects, many of them the kind of indoor-outdoor-homes for the middle class that have come to define not just California modernism, but post-war American housing in general. The exhibit is part of the Getty-sponsored initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in LA and will dazzle any fan of mid-century design. The show is up through September 8th. Here's a preview.

A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith, and Edgardo Contini, Architects and Engineer. Gross House, Mutual Housing Association (Crestwood Hills), Los Angeles, California, 1946-50. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith, and Edgardo Contini, Architects and Engineer. Schneidman House, Mutual Housing Association (Crestwood Hills), Los Angeles, California, 1946-50. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith, and Edgardo Contini, Architects and Engineer. Site Office, Mutual Housing Association (Crestwood Hills), Los Angeles, California, 1946-50. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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A. Quincy Jones, Sidney F. and Frances Brody House, Los Angeles, California, 1948-51. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects. Milton S. Tyre House, Los Angeles, California, 1951-54. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects. Milton S. Tyre House, Los Angeles, California, 1951-54. Transverse section through living room, dining room, and maid’s quarters. Courtesy Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA Library Special Collections.

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A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects. St. Michael's and All Angels Episcopal Church, Studio City, California, 1960-62. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects. Fairhaven Tract Eichler Homes Model LJ-124, Orange, California, 1961. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012.

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A. Quincy Jones and Associates, Architects. Warner Bros. Records building, Burbank, California, 1971-75. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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1 gross house

A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith, and Edgardo Contini, Architects and Engineer. Gross House, Mutual Housing Association (Crestwood Hills), Los Angeles, California, 1946-50. Photograph by Jason Schmidt, 2012. Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

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