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June 25, 2013
From a prefab house in Switzerland to a remodeled apartment in the Slovak Republic, these homes make use of an often ignored building material.
At the bottom of the stairs is a second living space that includes a fireplace. The couple couldn't find a television that didn't clutter the cool minmalism so they prefer to use a projector to watch movies. The sofa was designed by Barber-Osgerby for Cap

At the bottom of the stairs in this concrete home in Switzerland is a second living space that includes a fireplace. The couple couldn't find a television that didn't clutter the cool minimalism so they prefer to use a projector to watch movies. The sofa was designed by Barber-Osgerby for Cappellini, and the Djinn chair is by Olivier Morgue. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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Originally appeared in Swiss Mix
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Casa serpiente stairwell

Given Lima’s dry climate, the architects were able to introduce clever indoor-outdoor gestures in this concrete home, such as an open stairwell, and semicovered walkways that allow the trees to provide cover. Photo by Cristobal Palma.

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Courtesy of 
Cristobal Palma
Originally appeared in A Modern Concrete Home in Peru
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Gregory and Caryn Katz are dwarfed beneath the cantilevered concrete overhang, which houses the bedroom on the upper level. The stackable glass doors that run beneath allow the house to open completely to the yard and swimming pool, soften the severity of

Gregory and Caryn Katz are dwarfed beneath the cantilevered concrete overhang, which houses the bedroom on the upper level. The stackable glass doors that run beneath allow the house to open completely to the yard and swimming pool, soften the severity of the concrete, and blur the boundary between indoors and out. Photo by Elsa Young

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Originally appeared in Katz's Cradle
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The concrete wall in the master bedroom of this home in Israel serves as a raw, textural headboard.

Originally appeared in Concrete Ideas
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The rest of Kordík's small apartment is given over to an open-plan living and bedroom. The waves of the concrete ceiling offer a bit of overhead character while lounging on the couch or in bed.

Lukáš Kordík's small apartment is given over to an open-plan living and bedroom. The waves of the concrete ceiling offer a bit of overhead character while lounging on the couch or in bed.

Originally appeared in True Value
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On the living room ceiling a Sivra fixture by iGuzzini modulates its output based on the amount of available daylight. The sofa is Wall by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani.

On the living room ceiling a Sivra fixture by iGuzzini modulates its output based on the amount of available daylight. The sofa is Wall by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.

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Originally appeared in It Takes a Villa
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At the bottom of the stairs is a second living space that includes a fireplace. The couple couldn't find a television that didn't clutter the cool minmalism so they prefer to use a projector to watch movies. The sofa was designed by Barber-Osgerby for Cap

At the bottom of the stairs in this concrete home in Switzerland is a second living space that includes a fireplace. The couple couldn't find a television that didn't clutter the cool minimalism so they prefer to use a projector to watch movies. The sofa was designed by Barber-Osgerby for Cappellini, and the Djinn chair is by Olivier Morgue. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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