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August 8, 2013
These five open-plan homes prove it doesn't take interior walls to give space a purpose.
From an extra-wide sliding glass door to a customized Bensen couch in the living room, everything in the house was designed for Siple’s utmost convenience.

Murray Siple's Vancouver home allows him to be completely self-sufficient despite his wheelchair. Every cabinet, counter, and table is custom-built for easy access, and the open layout of his living and dining area lets him move around without stopping to open doors. 

 

Photo by Misha Gravenor

Photo by 
Originally appeared in The Siple Life
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Modern living room with long green sofa and floor-to-ceiling glass doors

 

To maximize a Malibu home's stunning views, architect Bruce Bolander eschewed unnecessary walls and opted for one sprawling common area that showcases the surrounding landscape. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

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Originally appeared in Malibu Canyon House with a View
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The house is designed like an urban loft. Even elements such as the staircase and second-floor railings are almost transparent, so natural light floods the structure from dawn to dusk. Moseley's friend David W. Prasse (right) and designer Scott Ball take

An Atlanta home combines bold modern design with warm Southern hospitality, thanks to a flowing layout that connects almost every room in the house.

Photo by Mark Steinmetz

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Originally appeared in Mid-City Modern
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Miller House living room with Eames Compact couch

The iconic Miller House opened to the public in 2011; it's a veritable museum of mid-century-modern design. The home's common area includes a sunken couch space that defines itself as a room regardless of its lack of walls.

Photo by Leslie Williamson

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Originally appeared in Miller House in Columbus, Indiana by Eero Saarinen
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Dining room with custom oak table and Michael Thonet chairs

From the outside, a set of three 18th-century Swedish farm buildings appears traditional in the extreme. But inside, a simple modern aesthetic ties the organic aura of the countryside to the elegance of contemporary design; an open floor plan recalls the level fields of rural Sweden while abstract art and modern fixtures add visual complexity. 

Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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Originally appeared in Modern Meets Traditional in a Swedish Summer House
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From an extra-wide sliding glass door to a customized Bensen couch in the living room, everything in the house was designed for Siple’s utmost convenience.

Murray Siple's Vancouver home allows him to be completely self-sufficient despite his wheelchair. Every cabinet, counter, and table is custom-built for easy access, and the open layout of his living and dining area lets him move around without stopping to open doors. 

 

Photo by Misha Gravenor

Photo by Misha Gravenor.

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